Secularism

A split in Iraqi socialist group

Submitted by SJW on 18 July, 2018 - 10:54 Author: Nadia Mahmood & Martin Thomas

Nadia Mahmood of the Worker-communist Party of Iraq spoke to Martin Thomas about a split within her organisation.

Nadia: The resignation of our comrades Muayad Ahmed and Yanar Mohammad was announced after the central committee’s decision to take away Falah Alwan’s membership of the party.

MT: There must have been some political issues behind it, like the referendum?

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The Third Irish Revolution?

Submitted by SJW on 30 May, 2018 - 11:39 Author: Sean Matgamna
Magdalen Asylum

Have you heard the ultimate “Irish” joke? In a referendum on a united Ireland the Protestant Unionists of north-east Ulster campaign for “no” on the grounds that the South is too liberal. The people no longer fear God, maybe scarcely believe in God, and refuse to listen to their spiritual advisers.

The two-to-one vote on 25 May to rip up the 8th amendment to the Irish constitution — entrenched there by a referendum in 1983 — was a great empowering and liberating event for the women of Ireland, Mná na hÉireann. Legislation to allow abortion will soon follow.

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TV fictions and AWL reality

Submitted by SJW on 14 March, 2018 - 1:03 Author: Sean Matgamna
United in anti-AWLism: George Galloway and Nigel Farage. Now joined by The Daily Express and Ashok Kumar

An open letter to Ashok Kumar

It’s been said before, and it will bear saying again. If everything published by the Alliance for Workers’ Liberty in the last five decades were to disappear, and if future historians of socialism had to rely on what our political opponents said about us, then the historians would find it impossible to make political sense of the story.

On the one hand we are people who do, and have always done, everything we can to help workers in their struggle against employers and governments. We throw everything we have into that.

Comments

Submitted by martin on Tue, 20/03/2018 - 15:04

We sent the open letter to Ashok Kumar, of course, and politely offered him space in Solidarity to reply. He responded:

"I’m not going to dignify your racist-in-chief’s meandering, stream of consciousness whataboutery with a reply especially in light of this: http://www.workersliberty.org/story/2018-03-17/friends-israel-groups-blocked-joining-anti-racist-demonstration".

No evidence. No reasoning. No argument. But that's the way with that school of thought.

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Against the "my enemy's enemy is my friend" binary: an interview with Meredith Tax

Submitted by AWL on 4 February, 2018 - 7:33 Author: Andy Heintz

Meredith Tax has been a prominent feminist voice and political activist since the late 1960s. She is the author of several books including The Rising of the Women: Feminist Solidarity and Class Conflict, 1880–1917, Double Bind: The Muslim Right, The Anglo-American Left, and Universal Human Rights, and A Road Unforeseen: Women Fight the Islamic State, as well as two historical novels, Rivington Street and Union Square. Her 1969 essay “Woman and her Mind: The Story of Everyday Life” helped influence the US women’s liberation movement.

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Secularism is a women's issue: an interview with Marieme Helie-LucasAWLSun, 04/02/2018 - 19:00

Marieme Helie Lucas is an Algerian sociologist and the founder and former International Coordinator of the “Women Living Under Muslim Laws” international solidarity organization. Helie Lucas also is the founder of “Secularism is a Women’s Issue.” Helie Lucas has long been a critic of Western human rights organizations’ sole focus on the crimes of the state as opposed to the crimes of non-state actors. She is a fierce champion of secularism in governance and a harsh critic of all forms of religious fundamentalism.

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Letters: Socialism is not just 99% versus 1%; Women need equality in law!

Submitted by Matthew on 14 June, 2017 - 12:44 Author: Andrew Northall and Cathy Nugent

I am grateful to Martin Thomas for his response to my letter (Solidarity 439).Rather than seeking to avoid measures which would invite “a counter revolutionary reaction”, I was attempting to point out the very tight limits of social-democratic reformism, i.e. if you try and raise really serious amounts of revenue from the rich to pay for your reform programme, such a government will very quickly run into serious trouble.

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Religious practices should not be banned

Submitted by Matthew on 31 May, 2017 - 10:10

An Indian socialist presents a view different from Solidarity’s on an attempt to get the Supreme Court to rule unconstitutional the practice of triple talaq (where a Muslim man can divorce his wife in minutes by saying the word talaq three times).

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As we were saying: Oppose the fundamentalists! Defend free speech! (1994)

Submitted by dalcassian on 9 November, 2016 - 12:59 Author: Socialist Organiser Editorial 10 11 1994

“Half echo of the past, half menace of the future; at times, by its bitter, witty and incisive criticism, striking the bourgeoisie to the very heart's core; but always ludicrous in its effect, through its total incapacity to understand the march of mod ern history".

This description of reactionary, feudal "socialists" in the Communist Manifesto of 1848 fits Hizb-ut Tahrir perfectly.

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Blaming The Victims

Submitted by AWL on 21 October, 2016 - 7:37 Author: Marieme Helie-Lucas

The Algerian socialist-feminist Marieme Helie-Lucas responds to Deeya Khan's film Islam's Non-Believers, which was broadcast on ITV on 13 October.


For the past three decades, we have been witnessing the implementation in politics of the concept of perversity in psychology. Truly, this is a case study.

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France and the burkini bans

Submitted by Matthew on 31 August, 2016 - 10:40 Author: Theodora Polenta

On 26 August, the Supreme Court of France ruled against bans on the “burkini” by some south-of-France municipalities. The ruling was greeted with relief by women, by Muslims (including those opposed to religiously-imposed dress rules for women), and for the millions of women and men outraged by seeing four armed policemen on the beach of Nice publicly humiliate a Muslim woman in a burkini. The Court concluded that the ban is a “serious and illegal violation of basic freedoms”, and that local authorities may take such measures only if the burkini is a “proven risk to public order”.

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