Pensions

USS strike ballot: Vote No!

Submitted by SJW on 10 April, 2018 - 8:09 Author: a UCU member

University and College Union members are voting on a deal that would see strikes in over sixty universities called off in return for an independent review of pension provision. Voting ends on 16 April.

Fourteen days of strike action in February and March forced university bosses UUK to ditch a plan to end guaranteed pensions. But now strikers are being asked to put their trust in a process that may produce nothing better.

Add new comment

Revolt in the degree factory

Submitted by SJW on 14 March, 2018 - 11:55 Author: A UCU member
UCU London demonstration

On Monday 12 March Universities UK and the University and Colleges Union (UCU) announced they had reached an ″agreement″ at ACAS in the ongoing dispute over the USS pension scheme.

As details of the ″deal″ came to light UCU members across the country were at first confused as to why the UCU would have agreed such a deal, and then angry.

Add new comment

Student and workers say #NoCapitulation - Support the strikes!

Submitted by SJW on 13 March, 2018 - 4:08
No capitulation

Student occupiers, anti cuts activists and UCU members from across the UK spoke to Workers' Liberty

Bristol students occupation

An occupation of Bristol University Senior Management’s offices has forced the university to concede to most of their demands. A Bristol Uni occupier writes...

Add new comment

University pension revolt gains strength

Submitted by Gemma_S on 27 February, 2018 - 6:45
A big red picket fence in front of the gates to a University building.

See more coverage of student protests here.

As Solidarity goes to press, staff at 64 universities are on the fourth day of strikes over pensions which began on Thursday 22 February. Seven more universities are due to join in coming weeks.

There has been a strength of feeling on the picket lines unprecedented in recent university disputes. A thousand people joined a protest at Bristol, and at many other campuses numbers have been in the hundreds.

Add new comment

Unions must fight pension age increase!

Submitted by AWL on 26 July, 2017 - 9:18 Author: Dave Pannett

If like me you’re between 39 and 47 years old then the recent government announcement that you will have to work 18 months longer before you can retire will have angered and depressed you. Yet again as the government has moved the goalposts for workers. An increase in the retirement age to 68 was due to apply to people born after April 1978. The government now says the new standard of 68 will be introduced in 2039, which will affect those born between April 1971 and April 1978.

Add new comment

Temer versus the workers

Submitted by Matthew on 29 March, 2017 - 10:02 Author: Luiza Lago

On 22 March, Brazil’s coup government of Michel Temer brought forward a law, previously shelved, to legalise the expansion of outsourcing. Businesses will now be able to outsource workers for their primary activity (for example, teachers in a school). Government owned institutions can now use sub-contractors, opening the door for private sector interference in nationalised sectors.

Add new comment

Defend EU migrants’ right to stay!

Submitted by Matthew on 8 March, 2017 - 10:42 Author: Editorial

The House of Lords has voted by a large margin of 102 in favour of guaranteeing the rights of EU citizens in the UK after Brexit. With 358 in favour to 256 against, the Lords backed an amendment to the Article 50 bill, the bill giving the Prime Minister the power to trigger the Brexit process.

Add new comment

Four times more unequal

Submitted by Matthew on 15 February, 2017 - 11:08 Author: Colin Foster

According to the Financial Times (13 February), even big business people are starting to think that top-manager pay has gone over the top. Don’t expect anything too socialistic, but “long-term incentive plans” are being looked at more sourly, as research results heap up to show that the “incentives” have little correlation with business success.

The FT reports that top bosses now get an average of £4.3 million a year.

Add new comment

This website uses cookies, you can find out more and set your preferences here.
By continuing to use this website, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms & Conditions.