Online Pamphlets

Lenin and the Russian Revolution

Submitted by cathy n on 15 March, 2010 - 11:42 Author: Andrew Hornung and John O'Mahony
WL 3/28

Read online (below), or download pdf (see "attachment").

Who was Lenin? He led the workers of the Tsarist Russian Empire to make the most profound revolution in history in 1917. He was the leader of the Russian Bolshevik Party, without which the workers would have been defeated.

James Connolly's Socialism Made Easy: 1 WORKSHOP TALKS (1909 version)

Submitted by dalcassian on 12 February, 2016 - 8:53 Author: James Connolly

Contents:

SOCIALISM IS A FOREIGN IMPORTATION!

I AM NOT INTERESTED IN INTERNATIONALISM. THIS COUNTRY IS GOOD ENOUGH FOR ME.

CAPITAL IS INTERNATIONAL

BUT THE SOCIALIST PROPOSALS, THEY SAY, WOULD DESTROY THE INDIVIDUAL CHARACTER OF THE WORKER. HE WOULD LEAN ON THE COMMUNITY, INSTEAD OF UPON HIS OWN EFFORTS.

LET US BE PRACTICAL. WE WANT SOMETHING PR-R-RACTICAL.

WOULD YOU CONFISCATE THE PROPERTY OF THE CAPITALIST CLASS AND ROB MEN OF THAT WHICH THEY HAVE, PERHAPS, WORKED A WHOLE LIFETIME TO ACCUMULATE?

The Working Class Self-Education Movement: The League of the "Plebs"

Submitted by martin on 16 January, 2009 - 9:52 Author: Colin Waugh

In October 1908 industrial workers who were union-sponsored students at Ruskin College in Oxford founded what they called the League of the “Plebs”. Former students who had returned to their jobs as miners, railwayworkers, textile workers and engineers, supported them.

From January 1909 they began to organise socialist classes in South Wales, the North East, Lancashire and other working-class areas. Under the umbrella of the National Council of Labour Colleges (NCLC), there were, by 1926-27, 1,201 classes like this across Britain, with 31,635 students.

The first Irish left

Submitted by Daniel_Randall on 10 November, 2004 - 9:20 Author: Sean Matgamna

Identifiable left-wing politics first emerged in Ireland at the end of the 18th century.
It was the result of three revolutions.

The American revolution, which broke out in 1776. The French revolution, which started in 1789. And the “Glorious Revolution” of 1688 in which the English Parliament kicked out the would-be absolutist Catholic King James and put William of Orange and James’s Protestant daughter, Mary, jointly on the throne, under the control of Parliament.

Richard Franklin Pettigrew and the Fight Between Democracy and Plutocracy in the USA

Submitted by dalcassian on 16 December, 2015 - 10:56 Author: George Novack

Recent converts to capitalist “free enterprise” glorify this system of robber rule as the foundation of American democracy. However, the real traditions of plebeian democracy in the United States, especially since the Civil War, have been bound up with the mass struggles against Big Business. Many anti-monopolist battles have been waged under the banner of democracy by movements and individuals apart from the tendencies inspired and guided by Marxism.

Keynes, crisis, Marx, and Keynesianism

Submitted by AWL on 24 October, 2008 - 11:28 Author: Martin Thomas

By Martin Thomas
John Maynard Keynes posed many sharp questions about capitalism, often further developing ideas which Marx had sketched before him. He framed the whole issue as one of "safeguarding capitalism", but can "Keynesian" methods really do that?

This article (download as pdf, see "attachment" below) from Workers' Liberty 32, June 1996, surveys Keynes's insights and criticises bowdlerised "Keynesianism".

In defence of the French revolution

Submitted by martin on 23 December, 2010 - 10:43 Author: Martin Thomas

Click here to download pdf.

The Oxford dictionary dates the word "democrat" from 1790 ("an adherent or advocate of democracy; orig. opposed to aristocrat in the French Revolution"). It dates "revolutionary", in general use, from 1794; "liberal" in the modern sense and "constituent assembly" from 1801; "radical", from 1802; "socialist", from 1833.

The terms "right" and "left" in politics derive from where the factions sat in the French revolutionary assemblies.

Provos, Protestants, and working-class politics

Submitted by AWL on 27 October, 2014 - 9:08

Provos, Protestants, and working-class politics: an imaginary dialogue, by Sean Matgamna. (1986 text plus a 2007 introduction)

Download pdf

Download mobi e-book

Download epub e-book

The 1983 debate in Socialist Organiser, plus 1986 introduction and background briefing pages: download pdf.

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