The media

Democracy and social media

Submitted by SJW on 28 March, 2018 - 5:56 Author: Rosalind Robson

The scandal surrounding how Facebook shared with a Cambridge psychologist, and his firm (Global Science Research) the personal information of 50 million users, without their explicit consent, has revealed a gruesome network of right-wing academic, political and business connections.

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Behind Wakanda’s utopian vision

Submitted by SJW on 14 March, 2018 - 1:15 Author: Sameem Rahimi
Black Panther audience

Firstly, I like Black Panther as a character. My first introduction him was in the highly acclaimed (and short lived) ‘Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes’ TV series from 2010.

The portrayal of this character was that of a stoic, no nonsense, quiet member of the team, who relied on his instincts and intellect to overcome more powerful enemies.

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Messing up our minds

Submitted by AWL on 16 January, 2018 - 12:20 Author: Martin Thomas
flame wars

"Steve Bartlett, the company’s 25-year-old co-founder, regularly boasts to potential clients that he can make any hashtag trend on Twitter before he’s finished his presentation".

The Observer (14 January) reported on how Bartlett and his now multi-million pound company Social Chain shape how marketing is done on social media.

The report also sheds light on the low quality and corrupting effect of political argument carried out on social media - how it smothers real debate and investigation, and replaces it by constant churning of scandal and flame-warring.

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Selections, factionalism, and Akehurst

Submitted by Matthew on 6 December, 2017 - 1:22 Author: Will Sefton
Selections, factionalism, and Akehurst

“We may well have reached 'peak Momentum'. These are the most favourable political circumstances Labour’s hard left could envisage.

“They feel politically vindicated by the general election result, have a well-funded, well-staffed organisation holding a vast amount of data on Labour members and have reshaped Labour’s membership through successive rounds of mass recruitment.”

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Free Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe!

Submitted by Matthew on 15 November, 2017 - 10:33 Author: Charlotte Zalens

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, a British Iranian dual national, has been detained in Iran’s infamous Evin prison since April 2016.

Nazanin was on holiday with her young daughter visiting family in Iran when she was arrested and charged with “plotting to topple the Iranian regime”. Despite having refused requests to meet Nazanin’s husband and campaigners on her behalf for a year, Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson publicly contradicted her reason for being in Iran claiming she was “training journalists”.

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Unions must fight for robust rules

Submitted by Matthew on 8 November, 2017 - 9:31
Unions must fight for robust rules

Editorial from Solidarity 453

The public scandal which has erupted in the wake of reports of historical and current sexual assaults in Hollywood, and now the UK Parliament, has brought to light a day-to-day reality. The #metoo campaign was “successful” because it touched on a truth. Almost every woman has experienced some form of sexual assault or harassment.

The public conversation in wake of the reports and allegations is welcome and important.

Comments

Submitted by martin on Wed, 08/11/2017 - 18:39

We called for "robust codes of conduct, reporting policies, and sanctions" which "would also institutionalise due-process protections for those facing charges".

The need for that has been highlighted by the case of Carl Sergeant, a minister in the Welsh Labour government, who committed suicide on 7 November.

It seems clear now that Sergeant was sacked from his ministerial job without even being told in detail what the allegations against him were, let alone having the right to a fair hearing.

Presumably the Welsh Labour Party leadership panicked, and thought throwing Sergeant overboard to appear to be responsive more important than basic due process.

In any case, there must be due process. The cases of women (sometimes women bosses) using exaggerated or invented accusations of harassment against men are surely fewer than those of women being denied any road to redress after harassment by male bosses, but they exist.

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