Fighting global capitalism

Fair trade, free trade, and socialism

Submitted by martin on 9 February, 2008 - 9:17 Author: Paul Hampton

Trade is a vital part of the neoliberal economic, political and ideological regime that now dominates the world economy and most national states.

At various summits in recent years the world’s most powerful governments have promised to introduce a better deal on trade, aid and debt for the world’s poorest countries, especially in Africa.

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For a workers' audit!SJWTue, 22/05/2018 - 19:52

Two Parliamentary committees, both headed by right-wing Labour MPs (Frank Field and Rachel Reeves) have called the UK’s big four accountancy firms to be referred to competition authorities for potential break-up.

Investigating the collapse of Carillion, which made its bosses millions from taking on outsourced contracts, the MPs found that the firms supposed to audit (check) the firm’s figures were a “cosy club incapable of providing the degree of independent challenge needed”.

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Slump-prone economySJWTue, 01/05/2018 - 21:16

In the last year or so, world capitalism has had its nearest approach to a general economic revival since the crash of 2008.

A clutch of figures at the end of April show that the revival is very weak. Britain’s first-quarter GDP growth was reported at just 0.1 per cent. Britain’s GDP growth figure is only 1.2% during the past year, the lowest figure since 2013.

The “purchasing manager’s index” for Britain’s industry was at a 17 month low in April.

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Socialism or capitalism? [AUDIO & TEXT]SJWWed, 25/04/2018 - 12:20

On 17 March Katy Dollar of Workers’ Liberty debated Mark Pennington, Professor of Political Economy and Public Policy at King’s College London, on Socialism or the free market?

Here we present extracts from their speeches. The full speeches can be listened to below

Katy Dollar

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Protest Trump on 14 JulySJWWed, 25/04/2018 - 11:15

In January 2018, US President Donald Trump cancelled a planned trip to the UK.

His stated reason was that the famously unsuccessful realtor didn’t fancy the “off-location” US Embassy. But the real reason was almost certainly that Trump wanted to duck the huge wave of protest that anyone could see would meet any visit. The racist, authoritarian and climate-change-denying policies of the Trump administration stoked a storm of indignation and a series of huge rallies at the very suggestion of his visit.

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An instructive story about how laws are made

Submitted by martin on 23 December, 2017 - 8:56 Author: Martin Thomas
How the rich rule

The US Congress has passed the tax-cuts scheme pushed by Donald Trump and long desired by Republicans.

The Republicans say that a lot of people will get tax cuts in the short term, and that the big benefits ceded to the rich and to businesses will "trickle down" into improvements from workers. Everyone else says the tax changes are a shameless act of social larceny.

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Nine years on: the new left, neoliberalism, and the new right

Submitted by martin on 2 August, 2017 - 10:40 Author: Martin Thomas

Click here to download as pdf

The global credit crash of 2008 and the ensuing travails have produced delayed political effects. A shift to more right-wing, nationalist, and "identity" politics may move neoliberalism sharply to the right, or even explode it from within. The economic turmoil has also produced new life on the left, as yet on a low wattage.

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How states compete to offer low taxes

Submitted by cathy n on 5 February, 2016 - 10:33

Law professor Sol Picciotto has proposed a new approach to stop tax avoidance by transnational corporations. He spoke to Ed Maltby from Solidarity.

Taxing transnational corporations already involves international agreement, based on tax treaties. The issue is, what kind of agreement? Until now, there has only been loose coordination. That's because governments like to hang onto what they call "sovereignty".

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Industrial news in brief

Submitted by AWL on 27 January, 2016 - 12:54 Author: Peggy Carter, Gemma Short, Harry Davies, Gareth Davenport and Ollie Moore

Workers at the UK′s train operating companies are facing a huge attack on their pensions due to government legislation that ends the contracting-out of the Second State Pension. The legislation means higher National Insurance contributions for both employees (1.4%) and employers (3.4%).

The government has also passed legislation to help employers out with this — by allowing them to carry out annual raids on occupational pensions schemes, without even having to consult with scheme trustees.

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