Democracy, monarchy, republicanism

“A crushing blow for human rights”

Submitted by AWL on Thu, 10/01/2019 - 12:12
Stanstead 15

The Stansted 15 have spent their Christmas break awaiting sentence, having been found guilty under terrorist¬related legislation carrying a maximum life sentence.

On 28 March 2016, activists locked themselves onto the front wheel of a Boeing 767 that the Home Office had secretly chartered to forcibly deport 60 refugees and migrants to Nigeria and Ghana. They included a woman whose husband had threatened to kill her because of her sexuality and two people who have since been identified as victims of trafficking.

Soviets, workers' democracy, and workers' control

Submitted by martin on Fri, 24/08/2018 - 07:51

"Soviet" is the Russian word for council. In 1905 and in 1917 the Russian workers, in great social rebellions against the Tsarist regime, created "workers' councils" of delegates which not only coordinated struggles but, especially in 1917, took over functions of government.

The Russian workers' revolution of October 1917 had to create a new machinery of government. The old machinery of government had been broken up, and whatever fragments remained were mostly hostile. The Soviets took over the job of governing.

Celebrating wealth

Submitted by SJW on Tue, 22/05/2018 - 19:46

The past week has seen my perfectly reasonable, cool, and otherwise rock ‘n’ roll friends descend into a royal wedding frenzy not seen since … well, ever, really.

Somehow, Meghan Markle being divorced, mixed-race and from “a broken home” seems to have made it hip to celebrate this royal wedding in a way that Kate and Wills never was.

Up the Republic!

Submitted by martin on Tue, 22/05/2018 - 17:36

The ballyhoo about the Royal Wedding on 20 May 2018 is not harmless.

The campaign group Republic reckons that the Royal Family costs "£345m a year. The royals' official grant alone has jumped 145% since 2012, from £31m to £76.1m. Add to that costs met by councils, revenue from the Duchies and unpaid tax and you can easily see how the royals cost us so much.

"That £345m... is enough... to pay for 15,000 new teachers or 15,500 new firefighters".

Abolish the monarchy!

Submitted by AWL on Wed, 20/05/2015 - 08:54

After the election of a Tory majority government, it was heartening to hear Jack Straw on the Today Programme last week, taking up the cudgels for those benighted souls who need it most, like Prince Charles.

In the wake of the release of the so-called “black spider” memos from Charles to the Blair government, Straw told the BBC that it was “absolutely essential” that Prince Charles had been able to offer his views in private. If the public was entitled to know what Charles was saying, he added, it would “stop him saying anything at all to ministers”. 

Abolish the monarchy! Up the republic!

Submitted by Matthew on Wed, 23/05/2012 - 09:33

More than £10 million will come straight out of the public purse to fund the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Celebrations, along with millions more from private sponsors.

That’s money for pompous pageantry to celebrate an accident of birth, and an institution that more civilised countries than ours abolished centuries ago.

Even when they’re being rammed down our throat by the media and political establishment, there’s a temptation to dismiss the monarchy as an irritating quirk, a relic, but ultimately one that has no real grip on or connection to actual politics.

Sack the Monarchy!

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 01/04/2002 - 01:57

This article was originally published in Issue 1 of Bolshy, in December 1998, under the title "The Voice of Treason: The Royals".

The Queen Mum, everyone loves her, don't they. Did you know, she's 98 years old and is still in pretty good shape, apart from the odd new hip. And I've found out her secret, and it's not Oil of Ulay. Very simple, in fact. She's still going strong, cos She's Never Done A Day's Work In Her Life. If I bumped into her, I reckon I'd ask her round for a fish-based meal. Or kick her stick away.

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