Spain

Spanish dockers win

Jordi Aragunde, coordinator of the International Dockworkers’Council, has reported a victory, at least a temporary victory, for the Spanish dockworkers. They have been fighting the Spanish government’s plan to abolish the “pools” through which they are employed.

“As of March 17, the Spanish Government was unable to pass the Royal Decree to reform the Spanish port system. The Spanish Parliament has rejected this Decree, therefore acting to protect Spanish dockworkers.

Spanish dockworkers have been fighting government plans to abolish the “pools” through which they are employed.

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The Spanish Revolution and the Civil War, 1936-9 - A "Diary" of Events, by Leon Trotsky

Though Leon Trotsky’s writings on Spain fill a large volume, he wrote no concise overview of the Spanish revolution. Our “diary” is culled from the commentaries he produced all through the last decade of his life: the last item here is dated 20 August 1940, the day Trotsky was assassinated.

25 May, 1930

The Primo de Rivera dictatorship has fallen without a revolution, from internal exhaustion. In the beginning, in other words, the question was decided by the sickness of the old society and not by the revolutionary forces of a new society…

Leon Trotsky on the Spanish revolution, from 1930 to 20 August 1940, the day he was assassinated by a Stalinist agent.

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Spain 1936/7: A Study in Workers’ Power

Author: 

Miriam Gould

In many respects there were very close parallels between the proletarian revolutions of [Russia] 1917 and [Spain] 1936. Spain and Russia were both gripped by profound economic crises rooted in their semi-feudal land systems. Both were agricultural economies based on a poverty-stricken peasantry. Capitalism had made little headway in Spain because of its inability to compete with the great industrial nations which had got into the field ahead of it; and because of the restricted internal market open to it Spanish industry struggled along by supplementing the economies of the major powers.

The Spanish Revolution, 1936-7

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Revolution and betrayal in Spain 1936-7

Author: 

Sean Matgamna

It is usually called the “Spanish civil war”, the thirty month struggle that began in July 1936, when the Spanish military, led by three generals, Franco, Mola and Sanjurgo — of whom one, Franco, would emerge as dictator — revolted against the Popular Front government which had been elected five months earlier.

It is usually called the Spanish civil war but in fact it was the Spanish revolution.

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London Workers' Liberty forum. Spain, 1936-9: the revolution betrayed

7.30pm, Thursday 12 October
The Plough, Museum Street
Nearest tube: Tottenham Court Road

In 1936, in response to a fascist coup, the Spanish workers rose up and seized the factories and land, but could not consolidate their power. What happened? Why did the fascists win? What role did Marxism and anarchism play in the struggle? And what can the Spanish revolution teach socialists and the labour movement today?

A leaflet advertising the meeting is attached. For more information email office@workersliberty.org or ring 020 7207 3997

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Alone with our day

Author: 

W. H. Auden

The great Spanish revolution of 1936-7, tragically betrayed and defeated, has gone down in history as “the Spanish Civil War” (1936-9). Civil war it surely was, but that designation, civil war, embodies the politics and the slant on history of those who crushed the workers’ revolution in Catalonia and elsewhere.

Part of W. H. Auden's famous poem about the Spanish Civil War

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Spanish holidays and dialectics

Author: 

Daniel Randall

Perhaps Woody Allen is just a dirty old man. His relationship with, and marriage to, his adoptive step-daughter is well publicised. And recent films, such as 2005’s Match Point, have centred not so much around the philosophical conflicts and neuroses of his earlier works as on his latest muse Scarlett Johansson's cleavage.

Daniel Randall reviews Woody Allen’s Vicky Cristina Barcelona.

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Spain: Podemos split on strategy

Author: 

Eoghan Gilmartin

Last month Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias won an internal leadership contest against faction opponent Íñigo Errejón. A temporary truce has now been declared. The following extract from an article by Eoghan Gilmartin, written before the vote, explains the background and is reproduced from Jacobin online magazine.

Podemos, a party that traces its origins back to the indignados movement, is divided over how it should approach its new role as a force in Spain’s political institutions.

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Spanish radical left follow Dieudonné

Author: 

Yves Coleman and Marie Berger

Yves Coleman of Ni patrie ni frontières discusses how Podemos, Izquierda Unida and the Candidatura d'Unitat Popular (CUP) as well as representatives of the Spanish “cultural world”, defend the “freedom of expression”of the anti-Semitic magazine El Jueves.1

Spain is one of the European countries where anti-Semitic views are most widespread and, as in France, the so-called “radical left” there considers that the anti-Jewish and anti-Semitic propaganda is part of “freedom of expression” and that it must defend anti-Semites’ rights to pollute the media and social networks with their racist propaganda.

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Spanish politics at a crossroads

Spanish elections (held on Sunday 20 December) marked a defeat for the ruling right wing party. The Partido Popular only took 123 seats out of 230, 63 fewer than four years ago.

The Spanish social-democratic party, the PSOE, won 90 seats, Podemos 69, and Ciudadanos, a rightwing anti-corruption party, 40.

An interview with Alex Merlo, parliamentary attaché for the Member of the European Parliament Miguel Urbán Crespo, members of Podemos, and of Anticapitalistas, the Spanish section of the Fourth International.

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