Eastern Europe

CZECHOSLOVAKIA 1968 (1968)

1: April 1968: A "Cultural Revolution"?

The attempt in Czechoslovakia in 1968 to create a "Socialism With a Human Face" was snuffed out by an invasion by the armies of the USSR and its other East European satellites. Where did the reforming regime come from? Two articles from Workers Fight, 1968

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Czech Imperialism and the National Question in Central Europe (1938)

Between the two imperialists world wars the Marxists considered Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and Poland to be imperialist powers, because in these three states there were oppressed national minorities – Croats, Kosovars and others in Yugoslavia, Slovakians and Sudeten ethnic Germans in Czechoslovakia, Ukrainians in Poland. If it could be taken apart from the entire context which in fact it had, and if German imperialism had not been German imperialism, Hitler's claim to the Sudetenland, where the majority wanted to unite with Germany, would have been more or less reasonable.

Between the two world wars Marxists considered Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and Poland to be imperialist powers, because in these states there were oppressed national minorities

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IS and Ireland, Czechoslovakia, and the national question (Easter Conference, 1969)

This text, part of the discussion on Ireland in IS (now called SWP) in 1968–69, attempted to expound the basic Marxist principles on national questions, as the Trotskyist Tendency (forerunner of AWL) understood them.



Introduction (2014)

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Against Jobbik and anti-semitism

On 27 April, 25,000 people protested against anti-semitism in Hungary.

Every year, a march takes place in Budapest to commemorate the Hungarian Jews killed in the Holocaust.

This year, a record number joined the march, with many marchers protesting against the rise of anti-semitism in Hungary. Just three weeks earlier, elections had seen the far-right, anti-semitic Jobbik party win 21 per cent of the national vote.

On 27 April, 25,000 people protested against anti-semitism in Hungary.

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Hungarian far right stymied

The leader of Jobbik, one of Europe’s largest far-right parties, held a rally in London on 26 January.

Jobbik, which is now the third-biggest party in Hungary, campaigns on an explicitly anti-semitic, anti-Roma platform. Its paramilitaries violently attack Roma communities, while its parliamentary statesmen denounce Zionist conspiracies and demand that the government draw up lists of influential Hungarian Jews.

With elections in Hungary approaching, Jobbik’s leader, Gábor Vona, came to London to drum up support amongst the city's large Hungarian community.

Anti-fascist mobilisation in London physically blocks Hungarian fascists.

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Freedom of movement for all

The latest ideas coming from reformists on migration are worth discussing.

On the one hand you have a recent Institute for Public Policy Research report which argues that we have to accept freedom of movement of labour within the EU and it distances itself from UKIP and the Tories. That’s fine. But it also talks about being tough on the misuse of these rights.

We are in favour of freedom of movement for all people around the world.

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Sheffield: “The Roma are under the cosh”

Andy Shallice, an socialist activist based in Sheffield, spoke to Solidarity about the background to David Blunkett’s recent attacks on Roma migrants living in Page Hall, Sheffield.


In the original Radio Sheffield interview Blunkett did [about frictions between Roma and other communities living in Page Hall] there were no quotes about race riots.

A socialist activist in Sheffield describes the background to David Blunkett’s recent attacks on Roma migrants in the city.

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Revolution in the Russian Empire: For Socialist Freedom and Democracy

The program of the anti-Communist revolution in Eastern Europe can be summed up in one word: democracy. And its content can be summed up in one phrase: democratic socialism.

Today this can be asserted not as a hypothesis, a theory or a hope, but as a fact demonstrated and confirmed by every one of the great revolutionary movements which have challenged the rule of the Stalinist bureaucracy for the past decade and a half.

The revolutions in Eastern Europe represent a struggle for liberty, democracy and socialism.

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A Lesson of the Revolution: The Working Class vs The Totalitarian Myth

The Hungarian Revolution, temporarily defeated by Russian military force, has nonetheless already accomplished outstanding wonders and recorded magnificent victories, and that by virtue of its occurrence alone. It has dealt shattering blows to Stalinist barbarism as a world system, erecting a mighty barrier to Russian and international Stalinist aspirations to global domination.

The Hungarian Revolution shattered the myth that totalitarian society is invincible and unaffected by class struggle.

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