Asia

Daesh resurgence in Libya

Author: 

Simon Nelson and Charlotte Zalens

The fact that the perpetrator of the Manchester bombing, Salman Abedi, may have been part of a Daesh network in Libya has focused attention on the group outside of its main territories in Iraq and Syria. Daesh is known to have groups allied to it across the Middle East, Africa and Asia but in recent years their strength has grown in Libya.

Daesh now has groups allied to it across the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

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“Anti-imperialist”? Or just right-wing?

Author: 

Colin Foster

The Philippines’ new president, Rodrigo Duterte, announced in Beijing on 21 October: “I announce my separation from the United States, both in military but economics also”.

“America has lost it... I realigned myself in your [China’s] ideological flow and maybe I will also go to Russia to talk to Putin and tell him that there are three of us against the world: China, Philippines and Russia”.

By the criteria of many on the left, Duterte’s declarations in Beijing qualify him as “anti-imperialist” and “progressive”. In fact, however, he is a right-wing populist who prides himself on his support for vigilante groups killing drug users, petty criminals and street children.

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Welfare or jail?

Wealthy Japan is suffering an wave of shoplifting by elderly people. They do it so in order to get themselves sent to jail so that they can get food and shelter.

Over the last 20-odd years, the number of elderly inmates in jail for repeating the same offence six times has risen 460 per cent.

Japan is suffering an wave of shoplifting by elderly people. They do it so in order to get themselves sent to jail so that they can get food and shelter.

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Capitalism vs human life

Author: 

Martin Thomas

Capitalism has created life-enhancing possibilities. It has even realised some of them. My older daughter has epilepsy. In pre-capitalist times, if she’d had medication at all, it would have had no, or harmful, effects, and the seizures would probably have become more severe until they disabled and killed her. Today, she has been able to end the seizures with just a few pills, without side-effects.

Capitalism is creating grand possibilities, but simultaneously stifling, blighting, and threatening human life.

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New centres of capital

Author: 

Rhodri Evans

As of 2014, “developing Asia” — China, Singapore, South Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, and other countries — became a bigger exporter of foreign direct investment than North America (the US and Canada) or the whole of Europe.

The United Nations agency which monitors such things, UNCTAD, reports that “developing economies” produced 36% of all foreign direct investment in 2014, up from less than 10% as recently as 2003 (UNCTAD World Investment Report 2015).

As of 2014, “developing Asia” — China, Singapore, South Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, and other countries — became a bigger exporter of foreign direct investment than North America (the US and Canada) or the whole of Europe.

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Support the solidarity appeal by trade unions in Nepal!

The GEFONT trade union federation in Nepal has issued an appeal for solidarity. Please donate and spread the word!

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NEPALESE UNIONS LAUNCH RELIEF FUND

30 Apr 2015

Unions in Nepal are appealing for solidarity support following Saturday’s devastating earthquake in the country, which has claimed the lives of nearly 5,500 people and injured thousands more.

After Nepal's devastating earthquake, the Nepalese trade union federation GEFONT has issued an appeal for solidarity, including relief funds.

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Poverty multiplies Nepal earthquake toll

Author: 

Gerry Bates

Shaheen Chughtai, an official with the charity Oxfam, has written that Nepal’s “ability to cope with a major disaster”, like the 25 April earthquake, is “crippled by the lack of the kind of economic and social infrastructure that people in richer nations take for granted”.

Nepal’s ability to cope with a major disaster like the 25 April earthquake is crippled by the lack of the kind of economic and social infrastructure that people in richer nations take for granted.

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Philippines: why the typhoon killed

One of the deadliest storms since records began hit the Philippines on 8 November. Over 10,000 people have died. Extracts from a declaration by the Party of the Labouring Masses (PLM, a Filipino socialist party), on 10 November.


The people are still reeling from the impact of possibly the biggest typhoon to strike the country. Death toll numbers are rising rapidly. There is huge devastation.

Firstly, we have to support and take whatever measures are necessary to protect the people.

One of the deadliest storms since records began hit the Philippines on 8 November. Over 10,000 people have died. Extracts from a declaration by the Party of the Labouring Masses (PLM, a Filipino socialist party), on 10 November.

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The class struggle in Nepal

Class struggle in Nepal is in a period of “democratic reaction”. The masses feel betrayed. After the 2006 revolution, there has been no change in land and production relations. The revolutionary fervour has receded, and the revolution has been held back both by the opportunist leadership of the Maoists and the reactionary forces.

A Nepalese Trotskyist spoke to Workers' Liberty about the class struggle there.

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Singapore bus strike

Hundreds of migrant Chinese bus workers in Singapore have struck for higher pay.

Singaporean authorities have charged four workers with leading an illegal strike. If found guilty, they face imprisonment for up to a year, or a fine of S$2,000, or both.

Around 200,000 migrant workers from mainland China work in Singapore, including 450 out of 2,000 drivers at the SMRT bus company. Over 200 workers have so far participated in the strike.

Strikes in “essential services” are illegal in Singapore. The country’s last legal strike was in 1986.

Hundreds of migrant Chinese bus workers in Singapore have struck for higher pay.

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