Sudan

A long way to go on gay rights

According to the International Lesbian and Gay Association (ILGA) seven majority Muslim countries still maintain the death penalty for homosexual activity.

Afghanistan, Iran, Mauritania, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Sudan and Yemen still impose the death penalty for homosexual activity. In the northern Nigeria states which use Sharia law, homosexuality is also punishable by death.

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Class struggle is not “alien” to South Sudan

Tim Flatman (Solidarity 3/192) claims labour movement organisations were “culturally alien” to South Sudan and that we should not “impose” them on the new country.

Even in a country where advanced-capitalist class-relations do not yet predominate, organisational forms based on a struggle against exploitation will emerge. Some of the most inspiring recent instances of worker organisation have not come from the advanced-capitalist west but from countries like Indonesia, Nigeria, Eritrea.

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Sudan: opportunities for new social movements

Tim Flatman, who has recently returned from the region, concludes a series of three articles about South Sudan.

The process of referendum has had positive consequences for grassroots independent political organisation in South Sudan.

The referendum vote to secede from the North has had positive consequences for grassroots independent political organisation in South Sudan.

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Southern Sudan: starting to build social movements

In the first complete results of a referendum, 99% of South Sudanese have voted to secede from the north. Tim Flatman recently spent three months in South Sudan and continues a series of articles on the future of a new country, set to become independent in July.

Jobs, working rights, public services and control of resources are the current demands of southerners.

Jobs, working rights, public services and control of resources are the current demands of social movements in Southern Sudan.

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Sudan succession vote, what next?

Tim Flatman recently completed a three-month tour of South Sudan. In the first of a series of articles he reports on the recent referendum on secession and the future of the social movements in the new country.

Any election or referendum where the final result is expected to beat Alexander Lukashenko’s latest showing by nearly 20% on a 95% turnout would normally be regarded as suspect. To anyone familiar with the politics of South Sudan, however, a 99% vote for secession in a free referendum (held on 9-15 January) is highly plausible.

The first of a series of articles on the recent referendum on secession in southern Sudan and the future of social movements in the new country

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What if “teddy” teacher were Sudanese?

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Rosalind Robson

Gillian Gibbons, the teacher who was locked up by the Sudanese authorities for allowing her class to call a teddy bear Muhammad, said of her experience: “The Sudanese people I found to be extremely kind and generous and until this happened I only had a good experience.”

She also expressed hope that news of her experience would not stop westerners from going to Sudan.

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Peace in Darfur?

By Rosalind Robson

More than four years since the war in Darfur began and not much less time since a massive international campaign called for them, the UN has agreed to send “peacekeeping” troops to Sudan. The deployment coincides with an agreement between all but one of Darfur’s opposition groups, to jointly seek peace talks with the Sudanese government.

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End the genocide in Darfur

By Cathy Nugent

THE Islamist military dictatorship in Sudan has launched the second stage of the civil war in Darfur. They want to put down the groups which refused to sign a ceasefire and political agreement in May of this year. If they do not stop this assault, thousands of civilians will be persecuted and killed. In mid-September the UN reported government arial bombardments in the north of the region. They expect thousands of people to be displaced. Those people fear the campaign of terror which has always followed such bombardments, when government-backed militia has gone into villages to raze them to the ground and sexually assault the women there.

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