Max Shachtman

Max Shachtman and his legacy

Author: 
Eric Lee

Workers' Liberty recently began compiling series of recollections and reflections from activists who had been involved with the “third camp” left in the USA — those “unorthodox” Trotskyists who broke from the SWP USA in 1939/40 to form the Workers Party, and the tradition they built (the Independent Socialist League, and later the Independent Socialists and International Socialists). Here we print a contribution from Eric Lee. Eric joined the Young Peoples Socialist League (YPSL, the youth section of the Socialist Party of America, into which the Independent Socialist League had merged in 1958) in New York City in 1971.

The Workers' Party USA: “The freest party I ever belonged to”

Author: 
Al Glotzer

In Solidarity 242, we began series of recollections and reflections from activists who had been involved with the “third camp” left in the USA — those “unorthodox” Trotskyists who broke from the SWP USA in 1939/40 to form the Workers Party, and the tradition they built (the Independent Socialist League, and later the Independent Socialists and International Socialists).

Here, we reprint an extract from a speech by Al Glotzer given at the “Oral History of the American Left Conference”, organised by the Tamiment Library in New York from May 6-7, 1983.

Neither Washington nor Moscow: those were the days

Author: 
David Finkel & Marty Oppenheimer

We continue our series of recollections and reflections from activists who were involved with the “third camp” left in the United States — those “unorthodox” Trotskyists who believed that the Soviet Union was not a “workers’ state” (albeit a “degenerated” one), but an exploitative form of class rule to be as opposed as much as capitalism. This week, we publish contributions from people of two generations, David Finkel, who is now an editor of the Against the Current magazine in the US, and Marty Oppenheimer, who has been active in developing radical sociology.

The heart of the “third camp”

Author: 
Herman Benson & Gabe Gabrielsky

In Solidarity 242, we began publishing a series of recollections and reflections from activists who had been involved with the “third camp” left in the United States — those “unorthodox” Trotskyists who believed that the Soviet Union was not a “workers’ state” (albeit a “degenerated” one), but an exploitative form of class rule to be as opposed as much as capitalism. This week, we publish contributions from Herman Benson, one of the last surviving founder members of the 1939/40 Workers Party and former industrial editor of its paper Labor Action, and Gabe Gabrielsky, who was a member of the Young People’s Socialist League and later the International Socialists.

The other history of American Trotskyism

Date: 
3 February, 2011 - 19:30
Description: 

February Study Series from North East London Workers' Liberty

We live in a class society. Throughout history, economic and social crises have created huge clashes between the classes. We are living in such a time now, when the ruling class and the working class will lock horns and fight over the future of society. The big struggles of the past pose the big political questions for the movement of today.

The principal political question facing the working-class movement today is the problem of Stalinism. How did the Russian Revolution, the biggest expression of working-class democracy and solidarity in history, end in prison camps and tyranny? What is Stalinism and what does it mean for the workers movement today and the hope of a socialist future?

The only adequate answers to these questions have been the answers of the Trotskyist movement. This movement of working-class revolutionaries fought both capitalism and Stalinism to their deaths. In this educational series, we will look back on the debates of the early Trotskyist movement and what they mean for us today.

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