Theatre

Art, the grind, and the tutor

Author: 

Molly Burke-Kirwin

Review: The Pitmen Painters by Lee Hall (Lyttleton National Theatre)

Lee Hall’s play has orbited the country with great acclaim following its initial run last year at the National. Hall, is most famous for writing the popular Billy Elliot. The Pitmen Painters another political fable of our times, although this time, it is true events which have inspired Hall’s work.

Review of The Pitmen Painters by Lee Hall (Lyttleton National Theatre)

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No Sweat launches £2,000 appeal: Support Mexican workers' organisation

By Mick Duncan

Facing competition from China's new capitalists, the Mexican bosses are driving down wages, imposing ever poorer working conditions and constantly violating labour rights. Workers face long working hours, little or no health or safety guarantees, child labour, no freedom of association, and the violation of company Codes of Conduct.

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The writing on the wall

  • Going bust for an education
  • We don't want your vote
  • BNP's new Euro-bigots
  • 'Left-wing' xenophobia
  • Bridges to nowhere



Going bust for an education

A record number of people are expected to declare themselves bankrupt this summer. Many of them will be students trying to get rid of their credit card, student loan and other debts. According to the Department for Education and Skills, 899 students and graduates became insolvent last year, compared with 276 in 2002.

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Defend free speech

The Birmingham Repertory Theatre’s shameful decision before Christmas to cancel the play Behzti (Dishonour) was justified in the following way by Executive Director Stuart Rogers: “[Sikh] community leaders have been unable to guarantee to us that there will be no repeat of illegal and violent activities… we cannot guarantee the safety of our audiences… [W]e have decided to end the current run of the play on security grounds.”

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Arthur Miller (1915–2005).

Author: 

Pat Yarker

Fifteen years ago I went to see a production of Arthur Miller’s “The Price” at the Young Vic Theatre in London, where David Thacker was directing a number of Miller’s plays. At a time when Miller seemed to have been sidelined in his own country, his importance as a playwright of international standing was re-asserted on the English stage.

The work of the great leftist playwright

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The myths of Jesus

Gerry Bates reviews The Pauline Conspiracy by Peter Burton

The history of Christianity is irretrievably myth-ridden. Little is known about Jesus as a historical figure. The early Christians had as little scruples as later Stalinists about inventing things they thought would serve their cause. Surmises, more or less plausible, can be made, but only surmises. Karl Kautsky and others surmised that the myth-cocooned biblical Jesus might in reality have been a Jewish nationalist rebel against the Romans.

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Migrant Voices

Migrant Voices is a play which explores the experiences of asylum seekers and refugees in 21st century Britain. Based on in-depth interviews with Iraqi Kurds living in Salford, the show combines live music, drama and video to depict some of the harsh realities behind the media myths.

It shows people who have fled their homes to escape torture and persecution only to find themselves the victims of racist abuse and intimidation, with insecure and badly paid jobs and substandard housing. It also looks at the causes of the global instability that makes people into refugees.

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The life of Rachel Corrie

Robin Sivapalan reviews My Name Is Rachel Corrie, now showing at the Playhouse Theatre London

It is three years since American International Solidarity Movement activist Rachel was deliberately ploughed down by an Israeli Defence Force bulldozer in Gaza while trying to stop Palestinian houses from being demolished. The ISM have now disbanded. Palestinian homes are still being demolished. And Rachel Corrie’s diaries have been adapted into a performance monologue.

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And Shakespeare, which group was he in?

"In fact, every sect is religious." — Karl Marx

Many years ago I read with riveted fascination a big book on the history of a controversy that has more than a little interest for citizens of a socialist movement that has reduced itself to a sprawling archipelago of self-sealing, self-intoxicating, self-blinding sects - the dispute about "Who wrote Shakespeare?".

It was called Shakespeare's Lives, and written by S. Schoenbaum.

The dispute has raged for well over a hundred years now and rages still.

Parable for Socialists 3

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Heroines of revolution

Author: 

Amy Fisher

The London socialist feminist reading group went to see Heroines of Revolution, a play by the New Factory of the Eccentric Actor.

In a tiny community hall in Kentish Town, the play was performed moving around the room, with no separation between the audience and the actors. The play was a series of scenes from revolutionary history, with speeches and diary excerpts from well-known, and less well-known, women revolutionaries.

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