Jeremy Corbyn

LETTERS: Pseudo-political Disneyland & Corbyn's International Friends SJW Wed, 03/14/2018 - 12:18
Seumas Milne

Pseudo-political Disneyland

I really enjoyed reading Dan Katz’s article on pulling down statues. He makes a number of valid points.

Maybe I can add a few details. After it was pulled down, Stalin’s statue in Budapest was smashed up and one part of it was used as an improvised public urinal. Pretty soon after, all parts of the statue disappeared including the boots which initially remained stuck on their plinth. Rumour has it that everything was melted down.

Open up the Labour General Secretary contest

Submitted by SJW on 9 March, 2018 - 6:03 Author: Simon Nelson
Jennie Formby

The contest which has opened up over who will replace Iain McNicol as General Secretary of the Labour Party should be an opportunity to talk about what a left-led Labour Party should be like in its culture and structures. Whether it can be anything other than an acrimonious factional battle, and one that is impossible for ordinary Labour members to decode, remains to be seen.

Corbyn pledges more public ownership: Nationalise utilities and banks! Matthew Wed, 02/14/2018 - 12:23

Editorial from Solidarity 462

Speaking at a Labour Party event on 10 February, Jeremy Corbyn reaffirmed Labour’s 2017 manifesto pledge “to bring energy, rail, water, and mail into public ownership and to put democratic management at the heart of how those industries are run”.

Corbyn: transwomen welcome on all-women shortlists

Submitted by Matthew on 31 January, 2018 - 1:23 Author: Gemma Short

On the Andrew Marr show on Sunday 28 January, Jeremy Corbyn affirmed that “the position of the party is that where you have self-identified as a woman, then you are treated as a woman.”

Although the NEC is yet to make a formal announcement, it is expected that it will affirm that transwomen can self-define in order to stand on all-women shortlists and in women’s sections of the Labour Party, and will not be asked to have a Gender Recognition Certificate.

Books that can win

Submitted by Matthew on 31 January, 2018 - 11:47 Author: Colin Foster

The author Alan Sillitoe described how, as a national serviceman aged 19 in 1955, he was got to read Robert Tressell’s The Ragged-Trousered Philanthropists by an eager colleague saying: “This is the book which won the 1945 election for Labour”.

The Tories, in 1945, tried to counter by mass-distributing a book of their own, Friedrich von Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom.

The political shift of 1945 was shaped by books, and conversations around books, not by tweets or memes. If we want a similar big shift today, we need similarly heavy ammunition.

Corbyn is right on BDS

Submitted by Matthew on 10 January, 2018 - 12:52 Author: Ira Berkovic

In response to a tweet from Labour MP Kate Osamor supporting the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) campaign against Israel, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn clarified his own position on Israel/Palestine.

He made clear, again, that he supports an end to Israeli occupation and a genuine two-states settlement; an independent Palestinian state alongside Israel. He also reiterated that while he supports targeted boycotts of settlement produce, he does not support a blanket boycott of Israel.

Democracy review details emerge

Submitted by Matthew on 8 November, 2017 - 12:28

Labour has officially launched a democracy review. Jeremy Corbyn says he wants the party to become a “movement” and to boost the involvement of previously marginalised groups.

The first deadline of the review is 12 January. At this point it will consider the roles of BAME Labour, Young Labour, and the National Women’s conference.

The second phase covers the governance of Constituency Labour Parties (CLPs), the role of socialist societies, improving diversity and gender representation, strengthening participation, recruitment and social media.


Submitted by Matthew on 11 October, 2017 - 10:48

Colin Waugh’s review of The Russian Revolution: When Workers Took Power is right that Marxists must learn from the experience of workers’ struggles: revolutionary socialism certainly is dialogic. The Bolsheviks followed those principles and this helps explain their success in 1917. However I disagree with Colin’s critique of Kautsky and Lenin about the relationship between socialism and the working class.