Shorter working weeks

Aslef strike off

Submitted by Tubeworker on Fri, 10/06/2017 - 19:28

What’s in the settlement Aslef called off Thursday’s strike for? Well, it’s not entirely clear.

Union reports to members say the four-day-week trial on the Jubilee Line will be "analysed", and if seen as unsuccessful, a "nine-day-fortnight" may be looked at instead. LU have also said that the current steps to reduce weekend working will continue after the 2015-2019 pay deal expires. Additionally, the company has reportedly agreed to allow three drivers per depot to move to "pro-rata four-day working", on top of existing agreements.

Aslef calls strike for 5 October

Submitted by Tubeworker on Mon, 09/25/2017 - 13:12

Aslef has called a strike for Thursday 5 October, in its dispute with LU over work/life balance issues for drivers. RMT is in dispute over the same issues, but is yet to ballot its driver members.

The dispute is a hangover from the 2015 pay settlement, which committed the company to explore ways of improving drivers' work/life balance. The company has dragged its feet since, and the only concrete development has been the "four day week" trial on the Jubilee Line. Aslef wants that model rolled out of the rest of the combine.

The key to better work/life balance is a shorter working week

Submitted by Tubeworker on Thu, 08/24/2017 - 12:15

Both RMT and Alsef are in dispute with Tube bosses over train drivers' poor work life balance. In 2015, the London Underground pay deal contained commitments from management, notably over pro rota working (an option to do less hours for less pay), a reduction in weekend working, and a trial of a "compacted" four day, 36-hour week. However, these commitments have not been met and a dispute has begun.

On all these issues but one, both train drivers' unions are in agreement.

Drivers: Say No To Framework-Busting Trial!

Submitted by Tubeworker on Fri, 07/08/2016 - 13:12

The trial of a four-day week on the Jubilee Line could begin soon. The trial will see drivers working the same weekly hours but over four days rather than five. That means longer shifts of up to 10 hours when a meal break is included. And not just longer shifts, but longer "handle time." Maximum driving time without a break will go up significantly.

32, not 36!

Submitted by Tubeworker on Tue, 11/03/2015 - 21:26

RMT has been polling its driver members in a referendum to see if they want union negotiators to discuss the possibility of amending the drivers' framework to facilitate the trial of a four-day, 36-hour week in two depots. The results are due back this week.

The trial would necessitate increasing the maximum time spent on the front of a train (currently 4 hours 15 minutes).

Four-Day Week? Tubeworker Fri, 08/21/2015 - 09:57

A 35-hour, four-day week for drivers is nearly an industry standard, agreed by most Train Operating Companies in London, including Southern, South West Trains, Southeastern and TfL-controlled London Overground.

LU has tried to pretend that our demand for a 32 hour, four-day week is ridiculous, but it's LU, not our demands, that are out of step.

Workers in our industry are all striving for the same - and many TOCs are taking steps in the right direction. We should be part of the fight to reduce hours, working days and fatigue across our industry.

Duty of Care?

Submitted by Tubeworker on Mon, 05/25/2015 - 21:01

Tubeworker HQ recently received a report of a particularly shocking demonstration of the company’s lack of concern for its staff.

A worker who had a heart attack hasn’t heard from his manager once; not even an “are you alright?” email!

Moreover, the worker’s doctor told them they’d seen several similar heart cases down the years. The common feature in all of them? Shift working, and particularly working nights.

Special Requirements?

Submitted by Tubeworker on Thu, 06/07/2007 - 07:49

Remember the special events team? It has resurfaced as the 'special requirements team', and management want it to be paid for by the ticket office closures.

Excuse us, the 'special events team' was part of the stations shorter working week deal, and we (more than) paid for it then. LUL, obviously feeling rather cocky, now seem to think that they can make us pay for it twice!

Ticket Office Impossible

Submitted by Tubeworker on Thu, 12/28/2006 - 17:28

Note to Central Line management ... If you justify slashing SAMF jobs at the largest station on your line (Bank) by closing one of its ticket offices, then it stands to reason that when you finally see sense and reopen the office, you have to bring back at least a couple of the jobs you cut.

Otherwise, you might well see your new schematic/roster fall to pieces as soon as you impose it. And your staff will be stretched so thinly that they'll snap.

All Gone To Cock Tubeworker Wed, 12/06/2006 - 16:04

Cockfosters suffered staffing cuts when the shorter working week came in - although a concerted fight by local union activists meant they were much less severe than originally proposed.