Cops won't be able to evict ideas

Author: 
Martin Thomas

As of Tuesday morning, 28 February, "Occupy London" protesters were gathering at the movement's last remaining site, Finsbury Square, to talk about next steps.

At about 4am, cops, given the go-ahead by St Paul's Cathedral authorities, cleared away campers around the cathedral, giving them just five minutes to retrieve their belongings. The same morning, cops also evicted people at the "Bank of Ideas" linked to the Occupy movement, which in recent weeks has been at the disused Moorfields School, at the corner of Bunhill Row and Featherstone St in central London.

As of 8am, dozen of police were still shutting off Bunhill Row and Featherstone St to traffic, while a few evicted campaigners told Solidarity that the cops were refusing to let them retrieve laptops and other stuff from the school and that Southern Housing Group, which owns the site, was demolishing the school buildings that very day, after leaving them idle and intact for four years.

The "Occupy" site at Finsbury Square is owned by Islington Council, which so far has made no moves to evict the camp.

Despite everything, the "Occupy" movement in London kept its sites longer than in almost any other city.

Its four months of operation have seen a shift in which even the blandest mainstream politicians have started talking about making capitalism "responsible", "moral", "cooperative", and so on.

In other words: all attempts at reform over centuries have left capitalism fundamentally irresponsible, immoral, and destructively competitive.