PCS

Employers discuss plans to undermine unions

In leaked documents from HMRC (the tax and customs part of the civil service) we see in the open how bosses try to “handle” unions.

In the document a senior manager writes:“...If we are unable to persuade the new GEC (the union body that runs the PCS union in HMRC) and full time officials to change their stance this suggests that the usual rules for engagement with a trade union will not work.”

The paper recommends “aiming to marginalise PCS by maintaining dialogue only to meet statutory minimum requirements.”

Leaked documents show how civil service bosses try to “handle” unions.

Trade Unions: 

Publications: 

Rank and file must control pay fight!

Author: 

Editorial

The pay of FTSE 100 directors has risen by 21% in the past year. Meanwhile average wage increases have been just 2%, 1.6% in the public sector, below price inflation of 2% (CPI) or 2.7% (RPI).

Over half of the wage rises in the last year were below RPI. In a sample survey of wage settlements for six million workers between August 2013 and August 2014, 13% faced a wage freeze and only 8.3% had a wage rise above 3%.

We are in the longest period of wage depression since records began, as a TUC report found on 12 October.

The top union officials have shown themselves inept and inadequate. Now the rank and file must organise to take control of the pay fight.

Publications: 

Trade Unions: 

Strike to end low pay

Author: 

Editorial

Public sector workers from health, local government and civil service will strike over pay in the week beginning 13 October.

Unison, GMB and Unite local government workers (and some school workers) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland will strike on 14 October. PCS (the civil service union) will strike across Britain on 15 October. Members of the lecturers' union UCU in Further Education colleges in England have rejected their 1% pay offer by 85%. They will strike on 14 October, on the authority of a previous ballot.

Public sector workers from health, local government and civil service will strike over pay in the week beginning 13 October.

Publications: 

Trade Unions: 

Strike to beat low pay

Author: 

Editorial

Several big unions will strike over public sector pay on 13-14-15 October, but as yet are discussing no follow-up.

At present inter-union communication happens only between general secretaries, or not at all. There should be a joint meeting of the unions' elected executive committees to discuss further action.

Widely-spaced national one day strikes, by themselves, will not win on pay. Unions should use creative tactics to maximise impact, maximise member involvement, and minimise impact on their members' pay.

Strike in October; build connections across unions; press for a strategy to win!

Publications: 

Trade Unions: 

Strikes on 13, 14, 15 October

Author: 

Gemma Short

The ballot over NHS pay in Unison returned a yes vote with 68% in favour of strike action and 88% of action short of strike action.

Unison has called a four hour strike in all NHS services, from 7-11am on October 13. This is a different day to local government workers, who will be called out on October 14, and PCS (civil servants), who will be out on the 15th.

Both Unison and PCS now have a concrete demand for pay. In local government Unison is demanding whichever is higher out of a £1 per hour increase or the living wage. In the civil service PCS is demanding a £1200 or 5% pay increase.

Publications: 

Trade Unions: 

PCS to join October 14

Author: 

Gerry Bates

The civil service union PCS is almost certain to join the unions striking on 14 October over pay.

Local government workers who struck on 10 July are already set to strike again on 14 October. This time they may be joined by health workers also demanding pay rises.

Health workers’ wages have dropped in real terms every year since 2009, and between 12 and 15 percent since 2010.

This year 60% of workers are offered no rise, and others get one percent.

The civil service union PCS is almost certain to join the unions striking on 14 October over pay.

Publications: 

Trade Unions: 

After 10 July, extend the action

10 July saw the biggest strike in Britain since the 30 November 2011 pensions strike.

The strike, which involved hundreds of thousands of teachers, council workers, civil servants, fire fighters, and other public sector staff, shut down schools and local government services across the country. Workers’ Liberty members participating in the strike sent reports to Solidarity.

In Leeds, activists say the number of pickets matched the levels of the 2011 strike. Around 4,000 attended a city centre rally.

10 July saw the biggest strike in Britain since the 30 November 2011 pensions strike.

Trade Unions: 

Publications: 

Plan the fightback

The public sector strike on 10 July will be the biggest strike in Britain since the November 2011 strike over attacks to public sector pensions. Well over one million workers could take part.

The public sector strike on 10 July will be the biggest strike in Britain since the November 2011 strike over attacks to public sector pensions. Well over one million workers could take part.

Issues and Campaigns: 

Trade Unions: 

Publications: 

Build for 10 July strike!

Members of the public sector union Unison have voted by a 59% majority to strike on 10 July against a 1% pay offer and for a rise of at least £1 an hour.

In the week preceding the announcement of Unison’s ballot result, the National Union of Teachers confirmed it would join a 10 July strike.

Strike ballot results from Unite, GMB, and the Public and Commercial Services union (PCS) (all over public sector pay) are yet to be announced, and the Fire Brigades Union has a live ballot that will allow it to participate in a 10 July strike.

As over a million public sector workers prepare to strike against a pay freeze, statistics show that Britain is one of the most unequal countries in western Europe.

Issues and Campaigns: 

Trade Unions: 

Publications: 

New disability benefit “a fiasco”

Personal Independence Payment, the benefit launched last year to replace Disability Living Allowance, has already run into trouble.

Like Universal Credit, the new benefit combining payments to working-age claimants currently made through Jobseekers’ Allowance, Income Support and Working Tax Credit, PIP is being piloted in Northern England before being extended to the rest of country.

It is supposed to be in place by the end of next year although it now seems almost certain that the deadline will be missed.

Personal Independence Payment, the benefit launched last year to replace Disability Living Allowance, has already run into trouble.

Issues and Campaigns: 

Trade Unions: 

Publications: 

Pages