Civil liberties, justice, crime

Labour's martyrs: the story of Sacco and Vanzetti

Submitted by martin on 15 March, 2016 - 1:52 Author: James P Cannon and Max Shachtman

Workers' Liberty 3/53, published as a pull-out in Solidarity 397.

The story of the Sacco and Vanzetti case, told by James P Cannon and Max Shachtman, who were leading activists in the defence campaign.

Click to download as pdf

Afrin: Erdogan cracks down on Turkish dissent

Submitted by Matthew on 7 February, 2018 - 3:44 Author: Gemma Short

Eleven members of the Turkish Medical Association (TMA) were arrested on 30 January following the publication of a statement by the TMA condemning Turkey′s military action in Afrin, Syria. The statement called for an end to all hostilities and warned that war posed a threat to public health. The Turkish government, along with Syrian rebels, launched an assault on Kurdish-controlled Afrin in Syria on 21 January.

Deeper questions behind the Worboys case Matthew Wed, 01/10/2018 - 11:25

The news that the so-called “black cab rapist” John Worboys is to be released after just under 10 years in jail has put the criminal justice system and the way it deals with rape cases under scrutiny.

Worboys was convicted of one count of rape, five of sexual assault, and 10 of drugging. However police believe as many as 100 women may have been assaulted by Worboys. 85 women contacted police after Worboys’ conviction but no further charges were brought against him.

Unions must fight for robust rules

Submitted by Matthew on 8 November, 2017 - 9:31
Unions must fight for robust rules

Editorial from Solidarity 453

The public scandal which has erupted in the wake of reports of historical and current sexual assaults in Hollywood, and now the UK Parliament, has brought to light a day-to-day reality. The #metoo campaign was “successful” because it touched on a truth. Almost every woman has experienced some form of sexual assault or harassment.

The public conversation in wake of the reports and allegations is welcome and important.

Hillsborough: police to be prosecuted at last

Submitted by Matthew on 3 July, 2017 - 1:57 Author: Rosalind Robson

Last year, an inquest jury found that David Duckenfield was guilty of “manslaughter by gross negligence” Duckenfield was the police officer in charge of policing the fateful football match at Hillsborough, the ground of Sheffield Wednesday, in 1989. 96 people were crushed to death, and 400 others injured in an overcrowded pen.

Grenfell: the powerful are still not listening

Submitted by Matthew on 3 July, 2017 - 11:46 Author: Charlotte Zalens

So far all 95 tower blocks which have had their cladding tested since the fire at Grenfell in Kensington, west London, have failed fire safety standards. These buildings are potentially as dangerous for their tenants as Grenfell was. Many hundreds of buildings are still to be tested.

Shot for being black and sick

Submitted by Matthew on 3 July, 2017 - 11:14 Author: Charlotte Zalens

On 18 June Seattle police shot and killed Charleena Lyles after she reported a burglary. Charleena was pregnant, and was shot in the presence of her three children aged one, four and 11. The police claim when they arrived at her apartment she drew a knife, so they shot her. Audio recordings of the shooting show police started shooting very soon after entering the apartment — 15 seconds after shouting for Charleena to “get back”.

Justice for Grenfell!

Submitted by Gemma_S on 17 June, 2017 - 8:37 Author: Gemma Short

Late at night on Tuesday 13 June, a fire gutted Grenfell Tower in west London.

It is likely that a large number of people have died: firefighters have told people the number will be in triple figures. Many hundreds of people's lives have been destroyed as their family members, friends, neighbours, and homes have been taken from them.

Our solidarity is with those families and with the emergency service workers who battled to save them whilst witnessing harrowing scenes.

More police no answer to terrorists

Submitted by Matthew on 14 June, 2017 - 11:28 Author: Simon Nelson

The London Bridge terror attack was a stark reminder of the ease with which Daesh-inspired Islamists can kill and maim people when there is very little that the police or security services can do to stop them.Yet the focus on how to stop these attacks has been on increased policing on the streets, clampdowns on civil liberties and increased monitoring of the internet.