Secularism

Qu’est-ce que le racisme antimusulmans ?

Author: 

Sacha Ismail (Traduction: Yves Coleman, pour 'Ni patrie ni frontières')

La gauche et l’extrême gauche britanniques font fréquemment référence au concept d’« islamophobie », mais discutent rarement du sens exact de ce terme. Les musulmans qui vivent en Grande-Bretagne subissent-ils une oppression spécifique, en tant que musulmans, et si oui, laquelle ?

Cet article soutiendra le point de vue que les musulmans qui vivent en Grande-Bretagne souffrent d’une oppression, d’une haine et d’un fanatisme antimusulmans spécifiques, mais que, pour comprendre et décrire ces phénomènes, il nous semble plus adéquats de les qualifier de racisme antimusulmans.

La gauche et l’extrême gauche britanniques font fréquemment référence au concept d’« islamophobie », mais discutent rarement du sens exact de ce terme. Les musulmans qui vivent en Grande-Bretagne subissent-ils une oppression spécifique, en tant que musulmans, et si oui, laquelle ?

Language: 

Issues and Campaigns: 

Defying fundamentalism

In an article originally appearing in Against The Current, the publication of the US socialist group Solidarity, Haideh Moghissi reviews Karima Bennoune's Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here: Untold Stories from the Fight Against Muslim Fundamentalism.. This article originally appeared online here, and is from the March/April edition of ATC (No. 169).

An article from Against The Current, the publication of the US socialist group Solidarity, in which Haideh Moghissi reviews Karima Bennoune's Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here: Untold Stories from the Fight Against Muslim Fundamentalism.

Issues and Campaigns: 

Culture and Reviews: 

Revolutionary politics, imperialism, and anti-racism: a further reply in the "Marxism and religion" controversy

In an October 2013 article, Marcus Halaby of Workers Power attacked the AWL for our "neo-Shachtmanite" refusal to unconditionally support anyone fighting imperialism. Here, two AWL members respond.

Marcus Halaby’s polemic against Workers’ Liberty’s politics on religion, Islamism, and anti-imperialism (“The AWL’s anti-anti-imperialist Islamophobia”) is worth reading because it illustrates some differences between the political method of Workers Power and ourselves in Workers’ Liberty.

The AWL, Labour and the Left: 

Issues and Campaigns: 

Political Islam, Christian Fundamentalism, Marxism and the Left Today

Sean Matgamna

Click here for a range of articles that were part of the controversy sparked by the republication of this article

***

(Adapted from the introduction to Workers' Liberty 3/1: Marxism and Religion - January 2006)

Since Islamist terrorists attacked New York on 11 September 2001, religion, or concerns and interests expressed in religion, are at the centre of international politics to a degree without parallel for hundreds of years.

Issues and Campaigns: 

Around the world: 

Marxist Theory and History: 

Political Islam, Christian Fundamentalism, Marxism and the Left Today

In many countries, religion and disputes about, or expressed in terms of, religion have long been central to political life — in Christian Spain, Portugal, Ireland, or the USA; in Muslim Iran or Algeria; in Lebanon; in Israel-Palestine. Today, since Islamist terrorists attacked New York on 11 September 2001, religion, or concerns and interests expressed in religion, are at the centre of international politics to a degree without parallel for hundreds of years.

Since Islamist terrorists attacked New York on 11 September 2001, religion, or concerns and interests expressed in religion, are at the centre of international politics to a degree without parallel for hundreds of years.

Issues and Campaigns: 

Around the world: 

Marxist Theory and History: 

University of London cartoon controversy: defend the right to criticise religion!

The new year has seen a controversy about racism, secularism, freedom of speech and the right to criticise religion at two University of London colleges, UCL and LSE.

The new year has seen a controversy about racism, secularism, freedom of speech and the right to criticise religion at two University of London colleges, UCL and LSE.

Issues and Campaigns: 

Trade Unions: 

For the right to criticise religion!

A meeting of the Atheism, Secularism and Humanism Society at Queen’s Mary’s University in east London on 18 January, discussing “Shari’a Law and human rights”, was cancelled after a man burst into the room, filmed all the attendees and proclaimed he would “hunt down” anyone who insulted the Islamic prophet Mohammed.

An atmosphere cannot be allowed to develop where any set of beliefs, including religious ones, are protected from criticism or even mockery. The claim that secularist or atheist criticism of Islam is “insensitive” at a time when Muslims face discrimination in society conflates people of Muslim background with their religious beliefs. We do not have to defend religion, or abandon our criticisms of it, in order to defend religious people from racism.

Issues and Campaigns: 

Publications: 

Charles Darwin, revolutionary - AWL London forum

Date: 

19 March, 2009 - 19:30 to 21:15

Location: 

The Lucas Arms, 245a Grays Inn Road, Kings Cross, London

Description: 

2009 is the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of his On the Origin of Species - a book about which Karl Marx wrote that it "contains the basis in natural history for our views".

Yet since then, many right-wing movements have tried to claim Darwin and Darwinism.

At a time when Darwinian ideas about evolution, and scientific rationality more generally, are under attack from politicised religion, we are holding this meeting to celebrate this great thinker, explore his ideas and discuss their implications for Marxists.

Speaker: Les Hearn

Issues and Campaigns: 

The AWL, Labour and the Left: 

Should faith keep its fortresses?

While I am an atheist, I still respect people with faith (or superstition, as it is sometimes called). But should we respect faith itself?

Is there a real difference between faith and superstition, or are they just different words that people use for the same thing, depending on whether they want to refer to it warmly (faith) or coldly (superstition)?

Some people who are atheists themselves argue that faith should be respected as a valid way of knowing on questions which science cannot reach.

Does respecting people with faith mean we should respect faith itself?

Issues and Campaigns: 

Marxist Theory and History: 

Publications: 

"Between the two poles" - socialism and secularism

Azar Majedi of the Organisation of Women's Freedom in Iran and the Worker-Communist Unity Party delivered the following speech at a conference on secularism at Ivry-sur-Seine, Paris, on 2 December 2011. Although Workers' Liberty does not necessarily agree with all of Majedi's positions, this speech is a worthwhile contribution to debate on the topic.

A speech about secularism by Azar Majedi, given in Paris on 2 December, about secularism and the revolutionary left

Issues and Campaigns: 

Around the world: 

Pages