Iraq

Eyewitness: Iraq's new trade unions. The workers are organising

Ewa Jasiewicz spent eight months in Iraq, mainly in Baghdad and Basra, working for Occupation Watch. She worked with the trade union movement in Basra, especially the Southern Oil Company Union. From Basra she used to post regular reports at the anarchist website infoshop (www.infoshop.org), and via other web resources (for example, Voices in the Wilderness), about workers' struggles in Iraq. Clive Bradley talked to her.

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campaign: Solidarity with Iraqi workers!

No Sweat are organising solidarity with the re-emerging labour movement in Iraq. Who will fight for democratic rights and decent living conditions in Iraq? The best hope is the re-emerging labour movement. For 35 years the Ba'thist dictatorship crushed all independent politics and trade-union organisation. Now independent trade unions have been formed, distinct from Saddam's old state-controlled General Federation of Trade Unions.

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Iraq: help build "Third Camp" against US and Sadr

By Clive Bradley

The Iraq war itself was declared over last May. But in a real sense, the fighting in Iraq, which reached a new intensity this week, is the same war, still being fought. The American and British military machines won the official war quickly. But they prepared very badly for the peace. Now, there is no peace.

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The third pole: Appeal by the Worker-Communist Party of Iraq

The Iraqi cities have become a battlefield for the two terrorist and anti-human forces of our time. The two poles of this new terrorist war are US terrorism and militarism on the one hand and the terrorism of political Islam on the other. In an attempt to impose its military hegemony on the world, America launched a destructive war against Iraq and destroyed the basis of civility in this country and drove it to the verge of a very grim scenario. By establishing the state on the basis of sects and ethnicities, the US has empowered Islamic and ethnocentric forces, and thus has prepared the ground for a sectarian and ethnic war.

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US lurches into quagmire

By Clive Bradley

In Fallujah, an agreement has been reached between US representatives, the Interim Governing Council, and local civic authorities in which the US shortens the curfew, and allows proper access to the hospital, in return for insurgents handing over heavy weapons. Whether the local leaders who have brokered this agreement can hold the "mujahedin" to it remains to be seen. Part of the agreement is the re-establishment of the Iraqi police force, which collapsed at the beginning of the fighting - but this seems a tall order.

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Iraq: stop the massacres!

By Clive Bradley

"There is a man, face down, in a white dishdash, a small round red stain on his back... As we reach to roll him onto the stretcher Dave's hand goes through his chest, through the cavity left by the bullet that entered so neatly through his back and blew his heart out. There is no weapon in his hand. Only when we arrive, his sons come out, crying, shouting. He was unarmed, they scream. He was unarmed. He just went out the gate and they shot him... No one had dared come to get his body, horrified, terrified, forced to violate the traditions of treating the body immediately... He was unarmed, 55 years old, shot in the back." (From a report by Jo Wilding from inside the city of Fallujah, 13 April 2004 - describing the victim of an American sniper.)

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Debate & discussion: Too soft on USA?

The latest editorial in Solidarity (3/50) expresses a position on the current conflict in Iraq which I believe moves us too far towards some form of critical support for the US. The editorial seems to portray the current US offensive in Iraq as being a fight for a "relatively progressive" programme against Islamic reactionaries. This, I would argue, is certainly not the case.

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U-turns by Bremer

By Clive Bradley

The scandal of torture in Iraq is provoking a major political crisis for the Bush administration. But its general policy in Iraq is in crisis, too. Military analysts are calling the Iraq enterprise "Dead Man Walking"; as a veteran US military strategist put it: "we will win every fight, and lose the war, because we don't understand the war we're in."

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Stop the torture! Support Iraq's labour movement!

Very soon after they took over Iraq a year ago, the British and US "liberators" of the country turned into torturers.

The British put their experience in Northern Ireland to use, and tied, beat, and hooded prisoners.

The Americans beat prisoners, set Alsatian dogs on them, put electrodes on them, made them do degrading sexual acts in public. Some male prisoners were, it seems, raped.

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