The Russian Revolution and Its Fate

The two Trotskyisms during World War 2: Workers' Liberty 3/48

Submitted by AWL on 10 December, 2014 - 8:15

Tracing the development of "two Trotskyisms" through from the 1940 split to the 1944 polemic between Harry Braverman and Max Shachtman.

Click here to download as pdf or read online.

The pagination in the pdf is correct, but, by a mishap, the pages of the printed version of Workers' Liberty 3/48, as a pull-out in Solidarity 347, are in the wrong order. Our apologies to readers.

Check the printed version with the pdf, or follow this guide:

Workers' Liberty 3/11: 1917 - revolution for freedom and equality

Submitted by AWL on 7 April, 2007 - 10:57

The Russian Revolution, the Stalinist counter-revolution, and the working class (Analyses from Labor Action and The New International, 1942 to 1957)
Download pdfs (without pictures): pages 1 to 8; pages 9 to 16, or read it on this website by clicking here.

Glory o, glory o, to the Bolsheviks Matthew Wed, 11/15/2017 - 11:22
MilRevCttee

The Russian Revolution has had all sorts of things grafted onto the image it projects to us. But what was it in reality?

Letters Matthew Wed, 11/15/2017 - 10:41

Paul Vernadsky in his review of my book, The Experiment: Georgia’s Forgotten Revolution 1918-21 (Solidarity 453), is right to highlight the importance of this period for today. And he comes to the heart of our disagreement at the very end of his essay when he refers to the idea that “an impoverished, backward society cannot skip historical stages”. He calls this “Menshevik dogma”. No, Paul, that’s not “Menshevik dogma”. That’s Marxism.

An alternative to the Bolsheviks? Matthew Wed, 11/08/2017 - 10:38

Paul Vernadsky reviews The Experiment: Georgia’s Forgotten Revolution 1918-21 by Eric Lee.


Eric Lee’s mischievous new book, argues that the Georgian Menshevik republic was an alternative to the Bolshevik-led workers’ government, which came to power in October 1917.

This is absolute fantasy, which confuses discussion of working-class politics at the time and the importance of the Russian revolution for today’s class struggles.

The day of the revolution Matthew Wed, 11/08/2017 - 10:32
Lenin Speaking

At the dawn of November 7th the men and women employed at the party’s printing works came to the Smolny and informed us that the Government had stopped our chief party paper and also the new organ of the Petrograd Soviet.