William Morris

William Morris in political context AWL Tue, 11/25/2014 - 18:41

The William Morris exhibition Anarchy & Beauty at the National Portrait Gallery is well worth a visit for anyone interested in Morris, his art, and the late nineteenth-century socialist movement.

The Day Is Coming

Submitted by dalcassian on 31 March, 2014 - 9:06

Come hither, lads, and hearken, for a tale there is to tell, 
Of the wonderful days a-coming, when all shall be better than well. 

And the tale shall be told of a country, a land in the midst of the sea, 
And folk shall call it England in the days that are going to be. 

There more than one in a thousand in the days that are yet to come 
Shall have some hope of the morrow, some joy of the ancient home. 

For then--laugh not, but listen to this strange tale of mine - 
All folk that are in England shall be better lodged than swine. 

Forth the Banners Go: The Day Is Coming.

Submitted by dalcassian on 31 August, 2013 - 5:01

Come hither, lads, and hearken, for a tale there is to tell,
Of the wonderful days a-coming, when all shall be better than well.

And the tale shall be told of a country, a land in the midst of the sea,
And folk shall call it England in the days that are going to be.

There more than one in a thousand in the days that are yet to come
Shall have some hope of the morrow, some joy of the ancient home.

For then--laugh not, but listen to this strange tale of mine -
All folk that are in England shall be better lodged than swine.

Reclaiming William Morris

Submitted by Matthew on 17 June, 2010 - 11:01 Author: Nicholas Salmon

How Morris became a socialist is rather more complicated than is generally thought. Morris himself only made rare statements about how he became a socialist, spread out in his writings over 16 years. One of the things that finally convinced him was, ironically, John Stuart Mill’s attack on Fourier’s utopian socialism.

William Morris: Ecology and the shift to socialism

Submitted by AWL on 12 February, 2009 - 8:14 Author: Paul Hampton

The sixth part of a series by Paul Hampton

Sometime in 1882, William Morris decided he was no longer a radical and began to associate himself explicitly with socialism. He stated in How I Became A Socialist (16 June 1894) that by the summer of 1882 he was ready “to join any body who distinctly called themselves Socialists.” (Edward Thompson, William Morris: Romantic to Revolutionary, 1976)