The Russian Revolution and Its Fate

The two Trotskyisms during World War 2: Workers' Liberty 3/48

Tracing the development of "two Trotskyisms" through from the 1940 split to the 1944 polemic between Harry Braverman and Max Shachtman.

Click here to download as pdf or read online.

The pagination in the pdf is correct, but, by a mishap, the pages of the printed version of Workers' Liberty 3/48, as a pull-out in Solidarity 347, are in the wrong order. Our apologies to readers.

Check the printed version with the pdf, or follow this guide:

Tracing the development of "two Trotskyisms" from the 1940 split to the 1944 polemic between Harry Braverman and Max Shachtman.

Publications: 

Marxist Theory and History: 

Workers' Liberty 3/22: Max Shachtman on Isaac Deutscher's "Trotsky"

Can socialism be built through tyranny? Max Shachtman on Isaac Deutscher's "Trotsky". Download as pdf (see "attachment")

Can socialism be built through tyranny? Max Shachtman on Isaac Deutscher's "Trotsky". Download as pdf (see "attachment")

Marxist Theory and History: 

Publications: 

Workers' Liberty 3/11: 1917 - revolution for freedom and equality

The Russian Revolution, the Stalinist counter-revolution, and the working class (Analyses from Labor Action and The New International, 1942 to 1957)
Download pdfs (without pictures): pages 1 to 8; pages 9 to 16, or read it on this website by clicking here.

Marxist Theory and History: 

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The Bolsheviks and democracy

Author: 

Martin Thomas

A discussion of Samuel Farber's book "Before Stalinism", Polity Press, 1990.

Sam Farber, justly respected for his critical Marxist writings on Cuba, sums up his attitude in this book by quoting Victor Serge, an anarchist who rallied to the Bolsheviks after October 1917, became an activist in the Left Opposition, and then parted ways with Trotsky over his, Serge’s, rejection of Trotsky’s criticisms of the POUM in the Spanish Civil War.

Why "the Bolsheviks should have been more democratic" is beside the mark as an explanation for the Stalinist counter-revolution in Russia

Marxist Theory and History: 

The Russian revolution and the British left

Author: 

Chris Mathews

It is February 1917. A large crowd are gathered to hear socialists and pacifists denounce the war. As the speeches start the snow begins fall... The hundreds who assembled that snowy night, looking like a scene out of Dr Zhivago, were not in Petrograd 1917 but in Waterfoot, Rossendale.

The success of the October revolution and the experience of the Bolsheviks in leading that revolution was of untold importance to the British revolutionary left. The foundation in 1920 of the Communist Party (CPGB) was a massive leap forward for class politics in Great Britain, uniting all the major Marxist groups in Britain and both the political and syndicalist wings of the movement.

Marxist Theory and History: 

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War and the revolution

Author: 

Leon Trotsky

Continuing a series of extracts from Leon Trotsky’s History of the Russian Revolution, this explains how the Provisional Government worked to keep Russia in the First World War.


On 23 March [1917] the United States entered the war. On that day Petrograd was burying the victims of the February revolution. Twenty-five days later — during which time the soviets had gained much experience and self-confidence — occurred the 1 May celebration (1 May according to the Western calendar, 18 April Russian calendar).

This extract from Leon Trotsky’s History of the Russian Revolution explains how the Provisional Government worked to keep Russia in the First World War.

Marxist Theory and History: 

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Isolating the Russian revolution

Author: 

Morgan Philips Price

The following abridged article is by Morgan Philips Price, the Russian correspondent for the Manchester Guardian. First published in the US magazine Class Struggle in May 1919, it describes the foreign policy of all the ruling classes in Europe towards Russia after the October revolution.

This article by Morgan Philips Price, the Russian correspondent for the Manchester Guardian, first published in the US magazine Class Struggle in May 1919, describes the foreign policy of all the ruling classes in Europe towards Russia after the October revolution.

Marxist Theory and History: 

Publications: 

Russian lessons for today’s workers

Author: 

Vicki Morris

It is 100 years since the Russian Revolution, the most important event in working class history, when the workers of a country, Russia, took their country over. Albeit briefly they ran that country in their interests, and extended support to workers in other countries who wanted to do the same.

A review of The Russian Revolution: when workers took power by Paul Vernadsky.

Culture and Reviews: 

Marxist Theory and History: 

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Writing out anti-bourgeois art

Author: 

Hugh Daniels

Hugh Daniels reviews Revolution: Russian Art 1917-1932, at the Royal Academy until 17 April.

A review of Revolution: Russian Art 1917-1932, at the Royal Academy until 17 April.

Culture and Reviews: 

Marxist Theory and History: 

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