Verse

James Connolly's The Legacy

Come here my son, and for a time put up your childish play,
Draw nearer to your father’s bed, and lay your games away.
No sick man’s ’plaint is this of mine, ill-tempered at your noise,

James Connolly's The Legacy: The Dying Socialist to His Son is a powerful exposition in verse of the socialist view of working people throughout history.

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The First World War: Swear You'll Never Forget (verse)

HAVE YOU FORGOTTEN YET?
For the world's events have rumbled on since those
gagged days,
Like traffic checked awhile at the crossing of the ways:
And the haunted gap in your minds has filled with

Do you remember the rats, and the stench Of corpses rotting in front of the front line trench?

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Swear You'll Never Forget (the First world War)

HAVE YOU FORGOTTEN YET?
For the world's events have rumbled on since those
gagged days,
Like traffic checked awhile at the crossing of the ways:
And the haunted gap in your minds has filled with

Do you remember the rats, and the stench Of corpses rotting in front of the front line trench?

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Workers of Ireland! (By the author of "The Red Flag")

[To the tune of O'Donnell Abú]
Workers of Ireland
Jim Connell, author of The Red Flag, published this song in Jim Larkin's paper, the Irish Worker, in 1911. It goes to the tune of O'Donnell Abú

Jim Connell, author of The Red Flag, published this song in Jim Larkin's paper, the Irish Worker, in 1911. It goes to the tune of O'Donnell Abú

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Workers of Ireland!

[To the tune of O'Donnell Abú]
Workers of Ireland
Jim Connell, author of The Red Flag, published this song in Jim Larkin's paper, the Irish Worker, in 1911. It goes to the tune of O'Donnell Abú

Jim Connell, author of The Red Flag, published this song in Jim Larkin's paper, the Irish Worker, in 1911. It goes to the tune of O'Donnell Abú

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Workers of Ireland!

[To the tune of O'Donnell Abú]
Workers of Ireland
Jim Connell, author of The Red Flag, published this song in Jim Larkin's paper, the Irish Worker, in 1911. It goes to the tune of O'Donnell Abú

Jim Connell, author of The Red Flag, published this song in Jim Larkin's paper, the Irish Worker, in 1911. It goes to the tune of O'Donnell Abú

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The Red Flag

The people's flag is deepest red, 
It shrouded oft our martyred dead, 
And ere their limbs grew stiff and cold, 
Their hearts blood dyed its every fold. 

The great anthem of the labour movement, written in 1889 by Jim Connell, a one-time Fenian, on a train journey from Charing Cross to New Cross Gate.

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The AWL, Labour and the Left: 

The Song of the Classes

We plough and sow—we're so very, very low
That we delve in the dirty clay,
Till we bless the plain—with the golden grain,
And the vale with the fragrant hay
Our place we know—we're so very low.

Ernest Jones, 1819-1869, Chartist leader, friend of Friedrich Engels, was jailed for 2 years in 1848 for his political activities. He wrote this once very well known indictment of class society.

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Machine Gun

At the gates of the homes, at the gates of the palaces
that we have conquered
everywhere in the city
where the riot drags on cold, dull and strong,
everywhere at the doors of our homes
the machine-gun in the dark cowers.

Dull, to bring death;
blind, low, at the base of the earth,
blind, cold, of steel, of iron,
with the metal of their hate
elemental,
with their steel teeth ready to bite,
their clockwork,
wheels, nuts, springs,
their short black mouths on the mounts
squat ...

A poem written by Victor Serge in Petrograd (St. Petersburg) in 1919.

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Workers of the World, Awaken!

Join the union, fellow workers, /Men and women, side by side;/  We will crush the greedy shirkers/ Like a sweeping, surging tide; 

Workers of the world, awaken! 
Break your chains. demand your rights. 
All the wealth you make is taken 
By exploiting parasites. 
Shall you kneel in deep submission 

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