Verse

James Connolly's The Legacy

Come here my son, and for a time put up your childish play,
Draw nearer to your father’s bed, and lay your games away.
No sick man’s ’plaint is this of mine, ill-tempered at your noise,

James Connolly's The Legacy: The Dying Socialist to His Son is a powerful exposition in verse of the socialist view of working people throughout history.

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War, hell and hope

Author: 

Donald E Milner

The revolutionary socialist newspaper Workers’ Dreadnought (1914-24) published this poem on its front page, heading an article entitled “Soldiers ask what they are fighting for” on 20 October 1917.

A poem published by the revolutionary socialist newspaper Workers’ Dreadnought above a front page article entitled “Soldiers ask what they are fighting for” in 1917.

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A German soldier’s peace poem

From The Workers’ Dreadnought, 29 June 1918

A poem was found on the dead body of a German soldier. The British authorities reproduced it in facsimile and threw it from aeroplanes into the German lines.

Some of the copies were blown into the British lines, and a British soldier who caught one sent it to the New-York-based magazine Flying. The editor of Flying wrote: “Its value for propaganda purposes is a matter of opinion. The sentiment is of the class that Americans describe as ‘mush’.”

A German soldier’s peace poem from World War I.

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“Government”

Author: 

Janine Booth (intro) / Eva Gore-Booth (poem)

Eva Gore-Booth (1870–1926) was an Irish poet and dramatist, and a suffragist and labour movement activist.

She was the younger sister of Constance Markiewicz, the nationalist, socialist and feminist who took part in the 1916 Easter Rising and in its aftermath became the first woman elected to the British Parliament, but who, as an Irish republican, refused to take her seat.

This poem, “Government”, was published in The Workers’ Dreadnought (the newspaper of the Workers’ Suffrage Federation) in its Christmas 1917 issue.

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The First World War: Swear You'll Never Forget (verse)

HAVE YOU FORGOTTEN YET?
For the world's events have rumbled on since those
gagged days,
Like traffic checked awhile at the crossing of the ways:
And the haunted gap in your minds has filled with

Do you remember the rats, and the stench Of corpses rotting in front of the front line trench?

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Swear You'll Never Forget (the First world War)

HAVE YOU FORGOTTEN YET?
For the world's events have rumbled on since those
gagged days,
Like traffic checked awhile at the crossing of the ways:
And the haunted gap in your minds has filled with

Do you remember the rats, and the stench Of corpses rotting in front of the front line trench?

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Workers of Ireland! (By the author of "The Red Flag")

[To the tune of O'Donnell Abú]
Workers of Ireland
Jim Connell, author of The Red Flag, published this song in Jim Larkin's paper, the Irish Worker, in 1911. It goes to the tune of O'Donnell Abú

Jim Connell, author of The Red Flag, published this song in Jim Larkin's paper, the Irish Worker, in 1911. It goes to the tune of O'Donnell Abú

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Workers of Ireland!

[To the tune of O'Donnell Abú]
Workers of Ireland
Jim Connell, author of The Red Flag, published this song in Jim Larkin's paper, the Irish Worker, in 1911. It goes to the tune of O'Donnell Abú

Jim Connell, author of The Red Flag, published this song in Jim Larkin's paper, the Irish Worker, in 1911. It goes to the tune of O'Donnell Abú

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Workers of Ireland!

[To the tune of O'Donnell Abú]
Workers of Ireland
Jim Connell, author of The Red Flag, published this song in Jim Larkin's paper, the Irish Worker, in 1911. It goes to the tune of O'Donnell Abú

Jim Connell, author of The Red Flag, published this song in Jim Larkin's paper, the Irish Worker, in 1911. It goes to the tune of O'Donnell Abú

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