Music

Carnival: party or protest

Author: 

By Elizabeth Butterworth

This year Notting Hill Carnival will be held on 24-25 August.

In between the photographs of smiling policemen and the swathes of tourists, it’s important to remember Carnival’s history of anti-racism.

In August 1958, there were riots in London and Nottingham after racist murders such as that of Antiguan carpenter Kelso Cochrane. Young white men, numbering in the hundreds, attacked the houses of Caribbean residents on Bramley Road, West London. Oswald Mosley and other fascists were also spreading hatred.

Carnival's history of anti-racism

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Solidarity Sounds: an evening of music and spoken-word in support of Rainbow International

Date: 

30 July, 2014 - 18:30 to 21:30

Location: 

Union Chapel (Upper Hall), Compton Avenue, London N1 2XD

Description: 

Tickets will be £10/£6 (waged/unwaged) on the door

Featuring:

The Ruby Kid
Hailing from Nottingham (via Sheffield, and with roots in New York), The Ruby Kid is a spoken-word poet and hip-hop artist based in East London. He cites the US indie rap of Aesop Rock, WHY?, and Cannibal Ox as his key musical influences, and co-runs the monthly performance showcase "Out-Spoken" at The Forge in Camden.
The Ruby Kid's website

Elia Rulli
Elia combines funk, soul, and electro to create sound lauded as "extraordinary" by BBC 6's Tom Robinson. Whether appearing with his band The Low Tears, or performing stripped-down solo sets, Elia's music has what Attitude has called "the wit of Wilde [and] the voice of Wonder".
Elia's website

Nyakio Kung’u
Nyakio is a singer/songwriter from Kenya with a unique and fresh afro-soul sound. Her music speaks from the African and European cultures that she comes from, connecting humanity to the greatness that we all have inside of us.
Nyakio's website

+ more acts to be announced!

The gig will raise funds and awareness for Rainbow International, an activist collective set up to raise funds and support for LGBT+ struggles around the world. For more info, see here.

The business of folk

Hollywood has a long history of taking a real person and creating fictionalised versions. ‘Citizen Kane’, ‘Sunset Boulevard’, and ‘The Godfather’ all did this. The Coen Brothers did it themselves in ‘Barton Fink’ and they have done it again in their new film — ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’.

A review of the film Inside Llewyn Davis.

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“Blurred Lines”, playlists, bans and debate

A number of student unions have decided they will not allow Robin Thicke’s number one single “Blurred Lines” to be played in their commercial venues.

A number of student unions have decided they will not allow Robin Thicke’s number one single “Blurred Lines” to be played in their commercial venues.

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Trade Unions: 

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Remembering Paul Fyssas

Paul Fyssas, killed by a fascist in Piraeus on 17 September, grew up in the working class neighbourhoods of Keratsini.

Paul Fyssas, killed by a fascist in Piraeus on 17 September, grew up in the working class neighbourhoods of Keratsini.

The son of a shipyard worker in Perama, he in turn went to work in the yard.

From his school years he loved hip hop and from a listener quickly he turned into an artist. He continued to work from time to time in the yards, was a member of the Piraeus metal workers’ union, and consistently participated in its mobilisations.

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Born in the NHS benefit gig

Date: 

24 August, 2013 - 19:00

Location: 

The Cluny, Ouseburn, Newcastle, NE1

Description: 

Newcastle Workers' liberty supporters have been involved in organising Born in the NHS gig with Dog Years, Waskerely Way and DJs.
Its Sat 24 August - from 7.30/8pm at the Cluny, Ouseburn, Newcastle
https://www.facebook.com/events/489570824457784/

all funds to support coaches to TUC Save the NHS national demo

"The Witch Is Dead" - sexist or not?

Excerpts from a discussion among Solidarity readers about the using the phrase "The Witch Is Dead" about Thatcher's death.


I'll admit to laughing when I first saw "The Witch is Dead". But then I spoke to a comrade pointed out all the language being used to describe her was sexist, and she felt there would not be as much hatred if Thatcher had been male.

Excerpts from a discussion about the using the phrase "The Witch Is Dead" about Thatcher's death.

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Save Lewisham Hospital benefit gig

Date: 

21 March, 2013 - 19:00 to 23:00

Location: 

The Stretch, Goldsmiths College Students Union

Description: 

Come and listen to some of the best in live music and spoken-word poetry - including from campaign supporters, south London residents, and Goldsmiths students - and help raise funds and awareness for the Save Lewisham Hospital campaign.

More details, including line-up and ticketing information, is on its way. For now – save the date!

Facebook event here.

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