Books

Class struggle not relevant?

Author: 

Matt Cooper

According to Owen Jones Britain is dominated by an unitary elite — the Establishment. This is defined not so much by its wealth and power but by its ideology and mentality.

Acting as a united group, it promotes its interests and undermines popular democracy. Superficially this is an arresting thesis. It is, however, full of inconsistencies and gaps.

A review of The Establishment: And How They Get Away with It by Owen Jones.

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The AWL, Labour and the Left: 

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Forum & Reviews

Letters and debate, and reviews from WL38

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Forum:

Drugs: serious solutions, not vigilante repression!
The debate on the Workers' Government

Reviews:

Revolutionaries and victims
Roots of violence
Screen and life

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Marxist Theory and History: 

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Forum & Reviews

Letters and debate from WL 37:

What is state-capitalism?
Yes, but what is the revolutionary party for?

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Springtime for Eva and Argentina
Blair: a suitable case for treatment?
Not yet the brackets

Letters and debate from WL 37

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Marxist Theory and History: 

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Chun Tae-il: a life of struggle

Author: 

Beth Redmond

I finished reading this book within three days of buying it. When I’d finished, I asked everyone I knew what they knew about Chun Tae-il — no one could tell me much. This surprised me because his story struck me as hugely significant to both the working classes (the “minjung”) of his time, and to the struggles we face today.

The author of this biography, Cho Young-rae, could for his own safety only be identified after his death. The first versions of the book were inevitably banned by the South Korean authorities. It has since been turned into both a film and a play.

A review of A Single Spark, about Korean trade union organiser Chun Tae-il.

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Emile Zola, Socialism and Anti-Semitism

Émile Zola was one of the foremost novelists of late 19th century France. He was also sympathetic to socialism and a hero in the “Dreyfus Affair” of the 1890s. This interview with him by Max Beer appeared in the Social Democrat (magazine of the Social Democratic Federation, then the main Marxist group in Britain) of October 1902. Beer was the British correspondent of the German socialist paper Vorwärts and author of a History of British Socialism.

An interview with Émile Zola, one of the foremost novelists of late 19th century France who was also sympathetic to socialism and a hero in the “Dreyfus Affair” of the 1890s, which appeared in the magazine of the Social Democratic Federation, then the main Marxist group in Britain, in 1902.

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