IWCA

Why the Tories were winners on 4 May

by Colin Foster

THE election-figures expert John Curtice reckons that the 4 May local government poll outcome “was not a disaster for Labour” (Independent, 6 May).

Labour got the equivalent of 26% of a general election vote. That was low, but exactly the same as what Labour got in 2004 — before its 2005 general election victory.

Governing parties, these days, can lose out heavily in mid-term local government elections, and still go on to win general elections.

The AWL, Labour and the Left: 

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“Local people” demagogy is no answer

In the last council by-election in my ward, in Islington, north London, I voted for the Independent Working-Class Association.

I had my doubts, but the IWCA seemed to be making some effort to offer a working-class political perspective to the voters here — a corner of Islington which until recently was almost all big blocks of council and housing-association flats, and is still very heavily working-class, yet belongs electorally to the Liberal Democrats. The IWCA did well, coming third only 14 votes behind a competent New Labour candidate.

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Debate and discussion - Promising what they can't deliver

I read with interest Janine Booth's letter on the International Working Class Association (IWCA) in Solidarity 3/54, and I think she is basically right. However, I would make a couple of points.

The IWCA's success in Oxford has been both unexpected and spectacular. I wonder if the reason they are less electorally successful (although more visible in the community, and probably a lot more popular) in London is that in London their political approach is more honest and consistent.

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IWCA mayor candidate interviewed

Lorna Reid of the Independent Working Class Association is standing for London
Mayor on 10 June. The IWCA has one sitting councillor in Oxford, and has conducted
a number of very local campaigns in other areas, mostly in London. Solidarity
cannot agree with much of the IWCA's localist approach and their exclusive
stress on community issues. We have very a different, we think broader,
vision of independent working class politics. Cathy Nugent
interviewed Lorna, who is based in Islington.

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