What we do

Where we stand

Today one class, the working class, lives by selling its labour power to another, the capitalist class which owns the means of production. Society is shaped by the capitalists' relentless drive to increase their wealth. Capitalism causes poverty, unemployment, the blighting of lives by overwork, imperialism, the destruction of the environment and much else.

Against the accumulated wealth and power of the capitalists, the working class's basic weapon is: solidarity.

The basic programmatic statement of the Alliance for Workers' Liberty.

The AWL, Labour and the Left: 

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What we do in the workplaces and unions

The hope of changing the labour movement lies with its rank-and-file members. We concentrate our efforts not just on calling for resolutions to be passed and rule changes to be made, but fundamentally on helping and encouraging workers to organise, to stand up for themselves collectively, to develop a collective class
identity, and to fight for control in the workplace. We work to rebuild the unions from the ground up.

As the American Marxist Hal Draper put it:

<p>The hope of changing the labour movement lies with its rank-and-file members. We concentrate our efforts not just on calling for resolutions to be passed and rule changes to be made, but fundamentally on helping and encouraging workers to organise, to stand up for themselves collectively, to develop a collective class identity, and to fight for control in the workplace. We work to rebuild the unions from the ground up.

The AWL, Labour and the Left: 

Trade Unions: 

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What we do

Preparations are getting underway for the annual conference of the Alliance for Workers' Liberty, the organisation which publishes Solidarity. The conference will be held on the weekend of 29-30 April, in London.

Its job is to discuss and decide the broad lines of AWL policy for the next year. It also elects a national committee which will meet every six weeks or so to decide policy month-to-month. That committee, in its turn, elects a smaller, London-based, committee which can meet weekly and supervise the day-to-day work of the organisation.

The AWL, Labour and the Left: 

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What is Women’s Fightback?

Women’s Fightback is a paper produced by women in the Alliance for Workers’ Liberty. We hope it stimulates debate, but whether you agree or disagree please get in touch, and contribute articles, reviews and letters to this paper. Here is a brief explanation of who we are and what we stand for.

Who we are

We need to revive the women’s movement in the UK, Europe and world wide. That movement needs to be able to inspire the many young people who want to fight sexism, but who may not call themselves “feminist”.

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Issues and Campaigns: 

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What we do

The third in the AWL's new series of political day schools is scheduled for 19 November (in London) and 3 December (in Sheffield). It will be about “AWL and SWP”. Every week, in trade union branches, in colleges, on demonstrations, even on the doorsteps, AWLers have to argue our differences with the SWP. In Iraq, should we support the new labour movement, or the Islamist “resistance”? In elections, should we back George Galloway’s “Respect”, or vote socialist and Labour?

The AWL, Labour and the Left: 

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What we do

The AWL held the second of our new series of political day schools on 22 October (in London) and 29 October (in Sheffield). Attendance at the London school was good (twice the number that we had at the first day school of the series), but the Leeds attendance was a bit disappointing (smaller than at the first of the northern day schools, in Sheffield).

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Marxist Theory and History: 

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A collective political and intellectual life

On Saturday 22 October in London, and 29 October in Leeds, members, sympathisers, and friends of the AWL are meeting for the second in our new series of monthly day schools.

We decided on these day schools at our conference in May this year, as a way to increase the collective intellectual and political life of the AWL — and thereby make us more effective in that part of our activity which is, necessarily, made up of what AWLers do as individuals or very small groups in their workplaces, trade union branches, colleges, and neighbourhoods.

The AWL, Labour and the Left: 

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Marxist dayschools: Why workplace activism?

The Workers’ Liberty dayschools on “Marxists and the trade unions”, on Saturday 1 October were held simultaneously in Sheffield and London. Most of the schools’ time was given over to small workshop session. We started by considering why socialists should focus effort on workplaces and trade unions, rather than on other areas of activism which may be more easily accessible and sometimes more lively.

One reason is the potential power of strikes and other workplace action to shake society. But that’s not all.

The AWL, Labour and the Left: 

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